De Anza logo Course Outlines

Public Search

 
 
Close Window/Tab
PRINT VIEW -- Opens in new, second window. Use browser controls to close when finished.
Credit- Degree applicable
Effective Quarter: Fall 2015

I. Catalog Information

ICS 9
Race and Ethnicity: Belonging and Exclusion in the U.S.
4 Unit(s)

 

(See general education pages for the requirement this course meets.)

Requisites: Advisory: EWRT 1A or EWRT 1AH or ESL 5.

Hours: Lec Hrs: 48.00
Out of Class Hrs: 96.00
Total Student Learning Hrs: 144.00

Description: An examination of race and ethnicity as systematized practices of social classification used to determine belonging and exclusion of groups in the U.S. Thematic emphasis on citizenship and immigration, with historical and contemporary comparisons. Application of theories, concepts, and frameworks towards analysis of race and ethnicity in local contexts.


Student Learning Outcome Statements (SLO)

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Apply theories, concepts, and methodological approaches to analyzing race and ethnicity in relation to processes of inclusion and exclusion in the U.S., with emphasis on conditions of citizenship and immigration.


II. Course Objectives

A.Examine and compare historical and contemporary contexts of intercultural/ethnic studies
B.Identify changing and persistent notion of race and/or ethnicity as institutionalized categories of distinction that shape social relations of power in the face of a changing U.S. population
C.Assess past and present laws, ideologies, and practices of U.S. citizenship and compare racialized conditions of national belonging, with attention to cross cutting and mutually constitutive social categories of gender and class.
D.Identify and evaluate contemporary social science and policy-oriented research on race and ethnicity in the U.S.
E.Apply theories, concepts, and methodological approaches to studying race and ethnicity in local settings

III. Essential Student Materials

 None

IV. Essential College Facilities

 None

V. Expanded Description: Content and Form

A.Examine and compare historical and contemporary contexts of intercultural/ethnic studies
1.Origins of intercultural/ethnic studies as an educational enterprise in national context and in local settings
a.Critique of education system and its social function in stratification and exclusion
b.Historical period of 1960s in U.S.
c.College settings such as San Francisco State College, De Anza College
2.Current context of intercultural/ethnic studies
a.Focus and status of intercultural/ethnic studies from1960s to present
b.Intercultural Studies at De Anza College
c.Student demographics and academic measures of achievement at De Anza Collge
d.De Anza College stance on equity and diversity
B.Identify changing and persistent notion of race and/or ethnicity as institutionalized categories of distinction that shape social relations of power in the face of a changing U.S. population
1.Intellectual genealogy of “race” in popular, scientific, and scholarly discourse
a.18th century naturalist uses of “race”
b.19th and early 20th century popular ideology and scientific conceptualizations of race in relation to critical historical debates over national issues such as federal Indian reservations; the abolition of slavery; colonization of Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Guam, and the Philippines; and im/migration of people from eastern Europe, Mexico, China, Japan, and the Philippines
c.20th century scholarly theories of and debates about race in fields such as anthropology, biology, and sociology
2.Key historical moments in the institutionalization of state practices of racial classification as basis of group status, and belonging to polity or exclusion from state-protected rights
a.Early statutory attempts to define race and free/unfree status in colonial America, such as states’ determinations of race by maternal lineage, by appearance, and by blood-quantum
b.19th and 20th century judicial interpretations of race statutes, such as Dred Scott v. Sanford, Plessy v. Ferguson, Takao Ozawa v. U.S., U.S. v. Thind, Lum v. Rice, Hirabayashi. v. U.S., Korematsu v. U.S., Hernandez v. Texas, Brown v. Board of Education, Mendez v. Westminster
c.19th and 20th century immigration policies and racialized restrictions, such as 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, 1892 Geary Act, 1917 Immigration Act, 1924 Immigration Act, 1934 Tydings-McDuffie Act, 1952 Walter-McCarran Act, 1965 Immigration Act, post-9/11 immigration controls
d.Civil rights movement and anti-discrimination legislation in defining protected classes of people
e.Post-civil rights era racial stratification, policy debates (such as affirmative action in higher education admissions), and ideology of post-raciality
f.Changing categories of racial and ethnic groups as defined by the U.S. Census from 1790 to present
3.Development of contemporary social relations in the U.S. along lines of race, ethnicity, class, and gender
a.Current quantitative measures of well-being
1.Population along racial and ethnic categories
2.Economic measures of well-being such as comparisons of family income, weekly earnings, net wealth, and poverty rates
3.Social measures of well-being such as comparisons of educational attainment, health status, and housing quality
b.Qualitative discussions of post-civil rights American society
1.Demographic shifts due to post-1965 immigration
2.Bifurcation of racial and ethnic groups by socio-economic class such as Black middle-class and poor Blacks, Asian middle-class and poor Asians
3.Social privilege and power based on race, class, sexual orientation and gender as captured by notions such as unearned advantage and conferred dominance
C.Assess past and present laws, ideologies, and practices of U.S. citizenship and compare racialized conditions of national belonging, with attention to cross cutting and mutually constitutive social categories of gender and class.
1.Analytical distinctions of citizenship in contemporary scholarly critiques; challenges to citizenship as a linear process of ever-increasing inclusiveness
a.Formal citizenship and legal status
b.Cultural citizenship and claims of difference
c.Flexible citizenship and transnational subjects
d.Conditional citizenship and minority status
e.Neoliberal citizenship and moral economy
f.T.H. Marshall’s civil citizenship, political citizenship, and social citizenship
2.Historical laws and racialized, gendered, and class ideologies of citizenship
a.Enlightenment ideal of universal citizenship in context of nation-states and social contract
b.Republican citizenship and exclusion of the poor, women, slaves, and American Indians; Naturalization Act of 1790
c.Expansion by states of voting rights to propertyless white men and increasing restrictions on free black males (1819-1865)
d.Treaty of Guadelupe Hidalgo (1848) and white racial status of Mexicans as American citizens
e.Dred Scott v. Sanford (1857) and nullification of citizenship for African Americans
f.Fourteenth Amendment (1868) and divergent citizenship status for African Americans and American Indians until the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924
g.Changes in citizenship status of married women based on 1855 Married Women’s Citizenship Act, 1907 Expatriation Act, 19th Amendment, and Cable Act of 1922
h.Anti-Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino statutes in late 19th and early 20th century and unique category of “aliens ineligible for citizenship”
3.Contemporary conditions and controversies of citizenship
a.Undocumented immigration
1.Undocumented labor and capitalist production
2.Undocumented students and educational access
3.Immigration and anti-Mexican targeting
b.Temporary worker visas
1.H1-B allocations, and nation-building and nativist discourse
2.Anti-Asian targeting of high-tech workers
c.Immigration reform and anti-immigrant ideologies and policy proposals
d.U.S. position on dual citizenship
e.Post-9/11 controls on immigration
f.English-only movement
g.State-based bans on ethnic studies and debates over national identity
h.State-based voter identification/voting suppression initiatives and changing demographics of eligible voter population
i.Examples of local current events pertaining to exercises of citizenship by minority groups
D.Identify and evaluate contemporary social science and policy-oriented research on race and ethnicity in the U.S.
1.Theoretical frameworks and concepts of race and ethnicity drawing from fields such as sociology, cultural anthropology, critical comparative studies in race and ethnicity, and ethnic studies
a.Racial formation and processes of racialization
b.Debates on conceptualization of “ethnicity”
c.Notions of power and theorizing of minority status
2.Contemporary measures for assessing belonging and exclusion along racial and ethnic lines
a.Current quantitative measures of well-being
1.Population along racial and ethnic categories
2.Economic well-being such as comparisons of family income, weekly earnings, net wealth, and poverty rates
3.Social measures of well-being such as comparisons of educational attainment, health status, and housing quality
b.Qualitative discussions of post-civil rights American society
1.Demographic shifts due to post-1965immigration
2.Diversity and segmentation within racial and ethnic groups by socio-economic class since the 1960s
3.Theoretical implications for the near future U.S. racial configurations, such as Bonilla-Silva’s Latin Americanization of America, the model of segmented assimilation, and mixed-race identity
3.Examples of locally relevant research topics/studies focusing on belonging and exclusion in relation to citizenship and immigration
a.Labor rights, community organizing, and undocumented labor, such as Zlolniski’s study of janitorial industry in Silicon Valley
b.Workers’ rights, environmental justice, and racism, such as Pellow and Park’s study of the electronic industry’s toxic environment in Silicon Valley
c.Temporary worker visas, flexible capitalist production, and the racialization of labor, such as Banerjee’s study of Indian IT workers
d.Citizenship-making and racialization of immigrants and refugees, such as Ong’s study of Cambodians and East Asians in the San Francisco Bay Area
e.Youth, class, and aspirations for success, such as Shankar’s study of Asian Indian high school students in Silicon Valley and Davidson’s study of Latino, white, and Asian American high school students in Silicon Valley
E.Apply theories, concepts, and methodological approaches to studying race and ethnicity in local settings
1.Designing of student research project
2.Conducting of student research project
3.Synthesis and analysis of student research findings
4.Documentation of student research project

VI. Assignments

A.Reading
1.Assigned readings from required text
2.Supplemental in-class readings such as short essays and newspaper/magazine articles
3.Current events topics from on-line sources
B.Writing
1.Reflection paper that integrates student's personal experiences with ideas from assigned reading to explore how race and ethnicity have shaped their experiences of belonging and exclusion in the U.S. in the context of citizenship and immigration.
2.Guided research paper that requires student to design, conduct, and discuss a research-based project that examines race and ethnicity in a local setting by drawing on theories, concepts, and methods introduced by the course
3.Written assignments (such as a research worksheets) that document student's process of designing and conducting his/her research-based project, synthesizing and analyzing her/his findings, and integrating course theories, themes, concepts, and methodological approaches in the presentation of their research-based project.

VII. Methods of Instruction

 Lecture and visual aids
Discussion of assigned reading
Quiz and examination review performed in class
Homework and extended projects
Collaborative learning and small group exercises
In-class essays
In-class exploration of Internet sites
Homework and extended projects
Field observation and field trips
Guest speakers
Collaborative projects

VIII. Methods of Evaluating Objectives

A.In-class participation based on preparedness and contributions in class.
B.Midterm exams that require student to demonstrate understanding of concepts and discussions presented in readings and in class, as well as explain and assess central ideas/arguments and supporting evidence.
C.Written assignments and oral presentations that outline and explain how student is undertaking the research-based project.
D.Final research-based project that applies theories, concepts, themes, and methodological approach introduced in the course to examine the relationship between race and ethnicity on the one hand and belonging and exclusion in a local context on the other.

IX. Texts and Supporting References

A.Examples of Primary Texts and References
1.Lazar, Sian, ed. "The Anthropology of Citizenship: A Reader." Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell Press, 2013.
2.Foner, Nancy and George Fredrickson, eds. "Not Just Black and White: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity in the U.S." New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2005.
3.Horsman, Reginald. "Race and Manifest Destiny: Origins of American Racial Anglo-Saxionism" Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1986.
4.Park, John and Shannon Gleeson, eds. "The Nation and Its Peoples: Citizens, Denizens, Migrants." Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2014.
5.Omi, Michael, and Howard Winant. "Racial Formation in the United States: From the 1960s to the 1980s." New York: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1994.
B.Examples of Supporting Texts and References
1.Kretsedemas, Philip. "Migrants and Race in the US: Territorial Racism and the Alien/Outside." New York, NY: Routledge, 2013.
2.Kubrin, Charis E. and Marjorie S. Zatz, Ramiro Martínez, eds. "Punishing Immigrants: Policy, Politics, and Injustice." New York, NY: New York University Press, 2012.
3.Fox, Cybelle. "Three Worlds of Relief: Race, Immigration, and the American Welfare State from the Progressive Era to the New Deal." Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2012.
4.Roth, Wendy. "Race Migrations: Latinos and the Cultural Transformation of Race." Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2012.
5.Ong, Aihwa. "Buddha is Hiding: Refugees, Citizenship, and the New America." Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2003.
6.Zlolniski, Christian. "Janitors, Street Vendors, and Activists: The Lives of Mexican Immigrants in Silicon Valley." Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2006.
7.Banerjee, Payal. "Transnational Subcontracting, Indian IT Workers, and the U.S. Visa System." Women's Studies Quarterly, Volume 38, Numbers 1 & 2, Spring/Summer 2010
pp. 89-110.
8.Shankar, Shalini. "Desi Land: Teen Culture, Class, and Success in Silicon Valley." Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2008.
9.Hu-DeHart, Evelyn. "Ethnic Studies in U.S. Higher Education: History, Development, and Goals." Pp. 696-707 in Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education, edited by J.A. Banks & C.A. M. Banks. NY: Simon & Schuster Macmillan, 1995.
10.Yoshikawa, Hirokazu. "Immigrants Raising Citizens: Undocumented Parents and Their Children." New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2012.
11.Greer, Christina M. "Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream." New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2013.
12.Waters, Mary C. "Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities." Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001.
13.Vallejo, Jody. "Barrios to Burbs: The Making of the Mexican American Middle Class Paperback." Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2013.
14.Lee, Jennifer and Frank D. Bean. "The Diversity Paradox: Immigration and the Color Line in Twenty-First Century America." New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2010.
15.Weiner, Mark S. "Americans Without Law: The Racial Boundaries of Citizenship." New York, NY: New York University Press, 2008.
16.Castro-Salazar, Ricardo and Carl Bagley. "Navigating Borders: Critical Race Theory Research and Counter History of Undocumented Americans." New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., 2012.
17.Nicholls, Walter. "The The DREAMers: How the Undocumented Youth Movement Transformed the Immigrant Rights Debate." Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2013.
18.Román, Ediberto. "Citizenship and Its Exclusions: A Classical, Constitutional, and Critical Race Critique." New York, NY: New York University Press, 2010.
19.Anderson, Kimberly. "War or Common Cause? a Critical Ethnography of Language Education Policy, Race, and Cultural Citizenship." Information Age Publishing, 2009.
20.Jun, Helen Heran. "Race for Citizenship: Black Orientalism and Asian Uplift from Pre-Emancipation to Neoliberal America." New York, NY: New York University Press, 2011.
21.CQ Researcher Editors. "Issues In Race And Ethnicity, 6th Edition." Thousand Oaks, CA: CQ Press, 2013.
22.Bender, Steven. "Run for the Border: Vice and Virtue in U.S.-Mexico Border Crossings. New York, NY: New York University Press, 2012.
23.Molina, Natalia. "How Race Is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts." Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2013.
24.Pellow, David Naguib and Lisa Sun-Hee Park. "The Silicon Valley of Dreams: Environmental Injustice, Immigrant Workers, and the High-Tech Global Economy." New York, NY: New York University Press, 2002.
25.Yang, Philip. "Ethnic Studies." Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 2000.