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Credit- Degree applicable
Effective Quarter: Fall 2016

I. Catalog Information

ICS 4
Race, Ethnicity and Inequality
4 Unit(s)

 

(See general education pages for the requirement this course meets.)

Requisites: Advisory: EWRT 1A or EWRT 1AH or ESL 5.

Hours: Lec Hrs: 48.00
Out of Class Hrs: 96.00
Total Student Learning Hrs: 144.00

Also Listed As:

Description: An interdisciplinary examination of major concepts and controversies in the study of racial and ethnic difference in the United States. Exploration of race and ethnicity as historical and contemporary categories of identification in the context of social inequality. Social movements and policy debates on racial equity will be analyzed.


Student Learning Outcome Statements (SLO)

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Students will demonstrate critical thinking skills by analyzing race, racism, and racial inequality and will discuss different responses to various forms of racism and racial inequality. Emphasis will be on identifying and evaluating social practices and policies aimed at addressing existing forms of racism and racial inequality.


II. Course Objectives

A.Examine and compare historical and contemporary contexts of intercultural/ethnic studies
B.Analyze and explain history of changing ideas and definitions of race and explanations of racial difference in sciences and social sciences.
C.Assess and critique contemporary social scientific approaches to racial and ethnic inequality from multiple fields such as ethnic studies, sociology, anthropology, economics, and psychology.
D.Compare and evaluate explanations of contemporary relationships between the social formations and structures of race, ethnicity, gender, and class.
E.Analyze the life chances of various racial and ethnic groups using current and historical data.
F.Identify and differentiate the meaning and implications of racialized identity formation for the individual and the group, with particular emphasis on U.S. census racial and ethnic groupings, such as Asian American, Black, Native American, Hispanic, and White.
G.Identify and evaluate social movements and/or policy debates for racial justice and equity.

III. Essential Student Materials

 None

IV. Essential College Facilities

 None

V. Expanded Description: Content and Form

A.Examine and compare historical and contemporary contexts of intercultural/ethnic studies
1.Intellectual project of intercultural/ethnic studies and its formation in academic institutions nationally and locally
a.Social reforms and civil rights legislation in post-WWII and civil rights periods in U.S.
b.Analysis of education system based on theoretical and politicized critiques of social inequality, capitalism, labor, academic knowledge, and race and minority-majority relations
c.Case studies of intercultural/ethnic studies departments and programs such as the 1968 San Francisco State College strike and De Anza College from 1968-1970
2.Current conditions of intercultural/ethnic studies nationally and locally
a.Intellectual and institutional changes and trends in intercultural/ethnic studies from 1960s to present-day
b.Intercultural studies at De Anza College
B.Analyze and explain history of changing ideas and definitions of race and explanations of racial difference in sciences and social sciences.
1.Development of race as a concept in science from 16th to 20th century and in relation to period of encounters between Europe and New World as well as development of Atlantic slave trade.
a.Early modern taxonomies of "race," "peoples," "nations," types," and "species" by naturalists and other scientists in 16th through 18th century.
b.Changing measures of human difference (such as physical attributes, skin color, cranial size, intellect, moral qualities, psychological dispositions) that shape emergent notions of "biological race" in the 18th and 19th centuries.
c.Emergent 19th and popular 20th century ideology of race in the United States informed by scientific claims of distinct biological categories of innate human difference such as J.F. Blumenbach's five major divisions: Caucasoid, Mongoloid, Ethiopian/Negroid, American Indian, and Malayan (1775).
d.Influence of scientific notions of race on social policies in 19th and 20th centuries, such as Eugenics, immigration, education, and poverty relief.
2.Changing definitions of race and ethnicity in the law from colonial period to post-civil rights United States.
a.Institutionalization of slavery (i.e., status of "slave" and "free") and variety of state laws defining "white," "black," and "Indian" based on changing criteria such as maternal lineage, blood quantum, and ancestry during colonial, early republic, and ante-bellum periods of United States.
b.Creation of racial qualifications for citizenship and naturalization under law from 18th century until mid-20th century.
c.Challenges to racial restrictions of citizenship, naturalization, civil rights, and equal protection under law in 19th and 20th century U.S.
d.Changing U.S. census categories of racial and ethnic identification from 1790 until present in historical context.
3.Evolving and comparative definitions of race and ethnicity within the social sciences.
a.Focus on concept of culture within anthropology in contrast to race based on disciplinary debates about racial difference in late 19th and early 20th centuries.
b.The definition of race and ethnicity as social structures and the emphasis on theories of racial formation within ethnic studies and sociology.
c.Theories of ethnicity formation such as Horace Kallen's, Isaac Berkson's, Stephen Cornell and Douglas Hartmann's, and Victoria Hattam's contentions about the role of ancestry/primordialist claims and constructs of cultural distinctiveness.
d.Post-structuralist theory and emphasis on discursive formations of race and ethnicity, as well as subjectivity.
e.1998 American Anthropological Association's position on race.
C.Assess and critique contemporary social scientific approaches to racial and ethnic inequality from multiple fields such as ethnic studies, sociology, anthropology, economics, and psychology.
1.National debates and social issues of racial and ethnic inequality in the 20th and 21st century United States
a.Definitions of racial and ethnic inequality that count as societal problems deserving of collective action
b.Context of civil rights movement and social reform efforts to address racial and ethnic inequality
c.Context of post-civil rights era and national conversation in 21st century about race and racial inequality in the United States
d.Identification and critical evaluation of claims of post-raciality in post-Obama America.
2.Contemporary theoretical perspectives on racial stratification with emphasis on sociological perspective.
a.Functionalist approaches to stratification, such as Kingsley Davis and Wilbert Moore's ideas and critiques of their explanations.
b.Assimilationist theories of ethnicity such as theories of Anglo conformity, segmented assimilation, and pluralist models of assimilation.
c.Conflict approaches to stratification, such as class and race conflict models.
d.Cultural analyses of social stratification, such as social reproduction approaches.
3.Critiques of racial inequality based on theories of the origin of racism (i.e., racial inequality and ideology) in the U.S. from a historical socio-cultural approach.
a.Analysis and critique of contemporary racial discourse in the U.S. based on articulations of biologized racist ideology during the mid- to late 19th centuries.
b.Analysis and critique of 20th century scientific claims about "race" as a concept distinct from the concepts of "culture" and "ethnicity"
c.Analysis and comparison of formative and contemporary processes of racialization for groups in the U.S. in context of subordination and domination. Examples of group experiences include those of American Indians, Native Hawaiians, African Americans and Americans of African ancestry, Mexican Americans and other Latinos, Asian Americans, and European Americans
d.Examination of triangulation of racial formations among various groups, such as Blacks, American Indians, and Whites in Southeast in 19th and 20th centuries; Blacks, Chinese and Whites in American South in late 19th and early 20th century; and Japanese, Mexicans, and Whites in West in early 20th century
4.Theories of international and national economic divisions of labor and critiques of capitalist system and race from political economic approach
a.World systems theories and historical critiques of European colonialism and imperialism
b.Analysis of gender stratification, with theories of patriarchy and critiques of capitalistic division of labor.
c.Migration and labor market segmentation theories
d.Analyses of racialized and gendered migrant, diasporic, and transnational labor
5.Major concepts used in current theoretical approaches to analyzing racial and ethnic inequality from multidisciplinary perspective.
a.Concepts of and research on prejudice and stereotypes, and labeling theory, with emphasis on psychological studies.
b.Concepts of and research on individual and institutional discrimination, and privilege with emphasis on ethnic studies, sociology, and critical white studies.
c.Concepts of and research on racial ideology, racial formation, and racial identity development, with emphasis on historical, socio-cultural, and comparative ethnic studies.
d.Theoretical and empirical inquiries into the debate over the relationship between "race" and "class."
e.Idea of multiculturalism and critiques of its neoliberal ideology and its occlusion of dominance and subordination in social relations with emphasis on socio-cultural studies.
f.Post-civil rights retheorizing of the concept of racism, including ideas such as structural racism, laissez-faire racism, colorblind racism, and modern racism, with emphasis on sociological studies.
g.Rethinking of America's color line in terms of various models: white/non-white binary, black/non-black binary, white/honorary white/collective black tri-racial system.
D.Compare and evaluate explanations of contemporary relationships between the social formations and structures of race, ethnicity, gender, and class.
1.Discussions of labor, gender, ethnicity, and racialization across industries and in the workplace
a.Studies of employment and migration in central cities/urban, metropolitan, rural, and suburban areas of United States with attention to the racialized and gendered "poor," "working class," "middle-class/professional," and "elite"
b.Comparisons of histories, job positions, experiences, and self-identities of women and men of color, and white women and men.
c.Stereotypes and social status by labor type across industries and in the workplace with attention to gender, ethnicity, and racialization
2.Discussions of labor, gender, ethnicity, and racialization in the home and family relations
a.Studies of division of labor and household expectations among women and men with attention to ethnicity, race, and labor roles in and outside of home
b.Comparisons of household decision-making and hierarchies with attention to gender, ethnicity, racialization, and labor roles inside and outside of home.
3.Discussions of family class background, gender, ethnicity, and racialization in the education system and in schools
a.Studies of academic achievement and family educational history with attention to ethnicity, gender, and racialization
b.Comparisons of educational aspirations and student self-identities in schools with attention to gender, ethnicity, family class background, and racialization
c.Studies on stereotypes and social statuses of students with attention to gender, ethnicity, family class background, and racialization
E.Analyze the life chances of various racial and ethnic groups using current and historical data.
1.Operative terms for academic and general-public evaluations of inequality: concepts such as life chances, stratification, hierarchy, in/equity, equality, parity, under/representation, self-determination, civil rights, and social justice
2.Measures of social and economic well-being
a.Employment and occupational distributions by race, ethnicity, and gender
b.Income, wealth, and poverty levels by race, ethnicity, and gender
c.Educational attainment and economic returns on education by race, ethnicity, and gender.
d.Measures of health and access to health care by race, ethnicity, and gender
e.Distribution of descriptive representation in various arenas of the public sector (such as the criminal justice system; and executive, legislative, judicial branches of government), the private for-profit sector (such as corporate institutions), and the private non-profit sector (such as philanthropy).
F.Identify and differentiate the meaning and implications of racialized identity formation for the individual and the group, with particular emphasis on U.S. census racial and ethnic groupings, such as Asian American, Black, Native American, Hispanic, and White.
1.Discussion and examination of the dominance-subordination dialectic in the study of racial and ethnic groups, and the field of intercultural/ethnic studies.
2.Examination of the historical and contemporary statuses of subordinate and dominant racial and ethnic groups.
3.Study of identity formation and subject-making through theories of racialization with attention to gender, ethnicity, and class, with emphasis on qualitative socio-cultural studies.
4.Comparison of self-concepts and personal narratives in relation to life chances and racialized identities, with attention to ethnicity, gender, and class.
G.Identify and evaluate social movements and/or policy debates for racial justice and equity.
1.Historical and contemporary social reform and collective organizing efforts such as: the abolitionist movement, the Niagra movement, the civil rights movements, the Black Power movement, the Chicano movement, the American Indian Movement, the Asian American movement, the Young Lords, the immigrant rights movement, etc.
2.Contemporary social and policy debates associated with racial equity and justice such as: mass incarceration, the corporatization of the criminal justice system, schooling and educational stratification, immigration, affirmative action, racial profiling, death penalty, tribal gaming, tribal land claims, etc.

VI. Assignments

A.Required readings and preparation for in-class reading discussions.
B.Analytical papers examining a course topic, such as a contemporary example of racial and ethnic inequality in the U.S.
C.Preparation and delivery of group project or presentation based on a course topic, such as a social/policy debate related to racial justice and equity in the U.S.

VII. Methods of Instruction

 Lecture and visual aids.
Discussion of assigned readings.
Collaborative learning and small group exercises.
Discussion of course topics and videos in relation to real life examples drawn from students' experiences and observations.
Quiz and examination review performed in class.
Guest speakers
Field observation and field trips
In-class essays
In-class exploration of Internet sites

VIII. Methods of Evaluating Objectives

A.Observation and assessment of in-class participation based on preparedness demonstrated by contributions in class.
B.Quizzes and examinations that require students to demonstrate comprehension, application, and critical assessment of concepts, theories, and ideas introduced by the course.
C.Group projects or presentations that require students to demonstrate comprehension and critical examination of a contemporary example or social debate relating to racial equity and justice in the U.S.
D.Essays requiring students to employ critical thinking skills such as analysis of current or historical racial and ethnic patterns, the evaluation or application of theories explaining racial and ethnic inequality, a critique of historical or contemporary social policies having to do with racial equity and justice, or comparative experiences of racial and ethnic groups.
E.Final essay, exam or project that requires students to demonstrate comprehension and the abilities to apply, synthesize, and critically evaluate course concepts, theories, and ideas.

IX. Texts and Supporting References

A.Examples of Primary Texts and References
1.Aguirre Jr., Adalberto and David V. Baker. Structured Inequality in the United States: Critical Discussions on the Continuing Significance of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2008.
2.Bakan, Abigail and Enakshi Dua, eds. Theorizing Anti-Racism: Linkages in Marxism and Critical Race Theory. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014.
3.Grusky, David and Szonja Szelenyi. The Inequality Reader: Contemporary and Foundational Readings in Race, Class, and Gender. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2011.
4.Healey, Joseph. Diversity and Society: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender. Los Angeles, CA: Sage, 2011.
5.Keister, Lisa and Darby Southgate. Inequality: A Contemporary Approach to Race, Class, and Gender. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2012.
B.Examples of Supporting Texts and References
1.Adelman, Robert and Christopher Mele. Race, Space, and Exclusion: Segregation in Metropolitan America. New York, NY: Routledge, 2014.
2.Ahmed, Sarah. On Being Included: Racism and Diversity in Institutional Life. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2012.
3.Alexander, Michelle. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. New York, NY: The New Press, 2012.
4.Almageur, Thomas. Racial Fault Lines: The Historical Origins of White Supremacy in California. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1994.
5.Arrighi, Barbara. Understanding Inequality: The Intersection of Race/Ethnicity, Class, and Gender. NY, NY: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2007.
6.Blackwell, Angela Glover and Stewart Kwoh, Manuel Pastor. Searching for the Uncommon Common Ground. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company, 2002.
7.Bonilla-Silva, Eduardo. Racism without Racists: Colorblind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2013.
8.Fitzgerald, Kathleen. Recognizing Race and Ethnicity: Power, Privilege, and Inequality. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2014.
9.Gallagher, Charles and Cameron Lippard, eds. Race and Racism in the United States: An Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood, 2014.
10.Grusky, David B. and Szonja Szelenyi, eds. Inequality: Classic Readings in Race, Class, and Gender. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2006.
11.Krysan, Maria and Amanda E. Lewis, eds. The Changing Terrain of Race and Ethnicity. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2004.
12.Lacy, Karyn R. Blue-Chip Black: Race, Class, and Status in the New Black Middle Class. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2007.
13.Jablonski, Nina. Living Color: The Biology and Social Meaning of Skin Color. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2014.
14.Lewis-McCoy, R. L'Heureux. Inequality in the Promised Land: Race, Resources, and Suburban Schooling. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2014.
15.Massey, Douglas S. Categorically Unequal: The American Stratification System. NY, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2007.
16.Massey, Douglas S. and Nancy A. Denton. American Apartheid: Segregation and the Making of the Underclass. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.
17.Smedley, Audrey and Brian Smedley. Race in North America: Original and Evolution of a Worldview. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2011.
18.McLeod, Jay. Ain't No Makin' It: Aspirations and Attainment in a Low-Income Neighborhood. Westview Press, 2004.
19.Oliver, Melvin and Thomas Shapiro, eds. Black Wealth/White Wealth: A New Perspective on Racial Inequality. NY, NY: Routledge, 2006.
20.Omi, Michael and Howard Winant. Racial Formation in the United States: From the 1960s to the 1980s. New York: Routledge, Kegan and Paul, 1994.
21.Adelman, Robert and Christopher Mele. Race, Space, and Exclusion: Segregation and Beyond in Metropolitan America. New York, NY: Routledge, 2014.
22.Prewitt, Kenneth. What Is Your Race? The Census and Our Flawed Efforts to Classify Americans. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2013.
23.Pierce, Jennifer. Racing for Innocence: Whiteness, Gender, and the Backlash Against Affirmative Action. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2012.
24.Telles, Edward, Pigmentocracies: Ethnicity, Race, and Color in Latin America, Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolin Press, 2014.