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Credit- Degree applicable
Effective Quarter: Fall 2014

I. Catalog Information

E S 2
Humans, the Environment, and Sustainability
4 Unit(s)

 

Formerly:

(See general education pages for the requirement this course meets.)

Requisites: Advisory: EWRT 1A or EWRT 1AH or ESL 5.

Hours: Lec Hrs: 48.00
Out of Class Hrs: 96.00
Total Student Learning Hrs: 144.00

Description: A study of human evolution, biology and ecology, including human civilizations, past and present, and the interaction with the environment. Environmental worldviews (ethics), past and present, of the various cultural, ethnic, gender and socioeconomic groups will be explored.

(One field trip may be required outside of class time.)


Student Learning Outcome Statements (SLO)

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Assess (apply) the criteria necessary to be successful in the Humans, the Environment and Sustainability class.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Analyze and communicate the relationships between our health and the health of the environment in order to apply this information in a civic and community setting.


II. Course Objectives

A.Examine environmental studies as a field of study and its relation to other disciplines including human evolution (exploring the lineages from early hominids to modern humans), social sciences and related disciplines
B.Analyze human civilizations from hunter-gather through farmer-herder societies to modern time.
C.Explore human biology including how the human body utilizes natural resources such as air, water, nutrients and energy.
D.Examine human ecology with an emphasis on past, current, and future impact on the earth's natural resources.
E.Examine human population with an emphasis on past, current, and future trends.
F.Analyze past and present human use and exploitation of the earth's natural resources.
G.Examine the relationship between resource degradation and the changing role of humans in society.
H.Compare and contrast human land use ethics in world cultures.
I.Assess a sustainable worldview (ethic); both past and present, among various cultural, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups worldwide.
J.Analyze and explore possible solutions and sustainable approaches occurring worldwide.

III. Essential Student Materials

 None

IV. Essential College Facilities

 Kirsch Center for Environmental Studies including the Learning Maxes, Video-On-Demand System, Stewardship Resource Center (SRC), interactive classrooms (KC 115, KC 112, KC 239, KC 113), Cheeseman Environmental Study Area (ESA) and KC 113 Self-recording classroom for distance learning and videoconferencing technology.

V. Expanded Description: Content and Form

A.Examine environmental studies as a field of study and its relation to other disciplines including human evolution (exploring the lineages from early hominids to modern humans), social sciences and related disciplines
1.Explore geologic time table
2.Assess early hominids (Ardipithecus, Australopitecus, etc.)
3.Explore early human lineage including Homo habilis, Homo erectus, and Homo neanderthalensis.
4.Examine modern human lineage of Homo sapiens
B.Analyze human civilizations from hunter-gather through farmer-herder societies to modern time.
1.Explore hunter-gather societies
2.Examine farmer-herder societies
3.Compare and contrast with modern human societies
C.Explore human biology including how the human body utilizes natural resources such as air, water, nutrients and energy.
1.Compare and contrast human systems including skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, endocrine, reproductive, and excretory
2.Assess utilization of air, water, nutrients, and energy by the human body
3.Examine the impacts of pollutants and toxins on the human body
D.Examine human ecology with an emphasis on past, current, and future impact on the earth's natural resources.
1.Examine the past interaction between humans and the environment including utilization of water, air, soil, species, ecosystems, energy and minerals
2.Assess the present interaction between humans and the environment including utilization of water, air, soil, species, ecosystems, energy and minerals
3.Compare and contrast projected trends interaction between humans and the environment including utilization of water, air, soil, species, ecosystems, energy and minerals
E.Examine human population with an emphasis on past, current, and future trends.
1.Compare and contrast early human population size with current trends
2.Explore the concept of exponential growth and its relationship to projected human population growth worldwide
F.Analyze past and present human use and exploitation of the earth's natural resources.
1.Assess past exploitation of earth's natural resources
2.Compare and contrast past resource use with current trends both in the U.S. and worldwide
G.Examine the relationship between resource degradation and the changing role of humans in society.
1.Examine rural based versus urban based lifestyle
2.Assess the correlation between lifestyle and the impact on natural resources
H.Compare and contrast human land use ethics in world cultures.
1.Examine ethics associated with land use in Western cultures
2.Assess ethics associated with land use in non-Western cultures
I.Assess a sustainable worldview (ethic); both past and present, among various cultural, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups worldwide.
1.Compare and contrast concept of sustainability both present and past
2.Assess the differences among cultural, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups related to sustainable use of earth's resources; analyze reasons associated with different perspectives
J.Analyze and explore possible solutions and sustainable approaches occurring worldwide.
1.Explore the various solutions to the degradation of the earth's natural resources
2.Compare and contrast sustainable approaches to counter the degradation of the earth's natural resources

VI. Assignments

A.Reading assignments from the text
B.Assess and evaluate other pertinent readings to utilize in group discussions
C.Summarize lecture notes utilizing the Cornell Method of Note taking format
D.Writing assignments involving summary, synthesis and critical analysis of pertinent readings from textbook and periodicals
E.Group presentation on a sustainability topic

VII. Methods of Instruction

 Lecture and visual aids
Discussion of assigned reading
Discussion and problem solving performed in class
In-class essays
In-class exploration of Internet sites
Quiz and examination review performed in class
Homework and extended projects
Field observation and field trips
Guest speakers
Collaborative learning and small group exercises
Collaborative projects

VIII. Methods of Evaluating Objectives

A.Completion of reading and writing assignments including an assessment process to evaluate student comprehension of concepts and principles (e.g.air, water, food assignments).
B.Completion of team project including an assessment process to evaluate student comprehension of concepts and principles (i.e. book project on sustainability).
C.Written assignments will include a written critical analysis of the current research including the pros and cons of an environmental issue or topic
D.A final examination that will require students to demonstrate the ability to summarize, integrate and critically analyze principles and concepts examined throughout the course
E.Completion of lecture assignments

IX. Texts and Supporting References

A.Examples of Primary Texts and References
1.Withgott, J., Laposata, M. Environmental Science: The Science Behind the
Stories. (Custom Edition). 2014. Pearson Learning Solutions, Fifth Edition.
2.Compiled Chapters from Starr and Taggart. 2006. (available at De Anza bookstore).
B.Examples of Supporting Texts and References
1.Van Jones. 2008. Green Collar Economy.
2.Suzuki, D. 2007. The Sacred Balance: Rediscovering our Place in Nature. Greystone Books.
3.Caldicott, H. "If You Love This Planet." W.W. Norton. New York. 1992.
4.Ehrlich, P.R. and A.H. Ehrlich. "Healing the Planet." Addison-Wesley. New York. 1991.
5.Gore, A. "Earth in the Balance." Houghton Mifflin. Boston. 1992.
6.Nash, R. "Wilderness and the American Mind." Yale University Press. Wisconsin. 1967.
7.Robbins, J. "Diet for a New America." Stillpoint Press. Walpole, NH. 1987.