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Credit- Degree applicable
Effective Quarter: Fall 2014

I. Catalog Information

ANTH 1
Physical Anthropology
4 Unit(s)

 

(See general education pages for the requirement this course meets.)

Requisites: Advisory: EWRT 1A or EWRT 1AH or ESL 5.

Hours: Lec Hrs: 48.00
Out of Class Hrs: 96.00
Total Student Learning Hrs: 144.00

Description: Introduction to biological aspects of humans. A bio-cultural and an evolutionary approach is used to understand human variation and human evolution. Issues and topics will include, human variation and its adaptive significance, biological and behavioral evolution of humans, comparative primate anatomy and behavior, evolutionary theory, and the impact of cultural, technological and environmental change on human biology and behavior.


Student Learning Outcome Statements (SLO)

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Students will analyze human biological diversity as a response to physical, biotic, socio-cultural and biological factors.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Students will evaluate biological and behavioral similarities and differences between humans and non human primates.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Students will apply scientific, evolutionary, holistic and a multidisciplinary approach to understand human biology and behavior.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Evaluate human biology and culture as a response to 7 million years of evolutionary process.


II. Course Objectives

A.Recognize the immense scope of the multi-faceted discipline of anthropology and examine the interrelationships between basic areas of inquiry: physical anthropology, cultural anthropology, archaeology/prehistory, linguistic anthropology and applied anthropology.
B.Examine the basic conceptual ideas in physical anthropology concerning the scientific method, the theory of evolution, the role of culture and the determinants of primate behavior.
C.Examine the biological background for physical anthropology in terms of biochemistry, genetics, adaptation, and molecular biology. Apply the understanding of evolutionary theory to medicine.
D.Assess the primatological information about the living primates by comparing primate anatomy, behavior, gender roles, social organization, reproduction and ecology and by noting their diversity, classification and geographic distribution.
E.Analyze the fossil record of humanity by examining the evidence, questions, hypotheses, and controversies concerning human evolution in the light of current information on genetics, evolutionary processes, molecular evidence of evolution, and anatomy and behavior of living primates.
F.Examine the emergence and transformations of human culture over time, recognizing the various ancient cultural sources for modern human society.
G.Evaluate the importance of the environment in human success and evolution; Critically analyze the past and present impact of the environment on human populations and predict possible future outcomes for our species based on the present trends in environmental change.

III. Essential Student Materials

 Notebooks and assessment materials

IV. Essential College Facilities

 DVDs, videotapes, fossil casts, human variation materials, models, posters and charts on primate biology

V. Expanded Description: Content and Form

A.Recognize the immense scope of the multi-faceted discipline of anthropology and examine the interrelationships between basic areas of inquiry: physical anthropology, cultural anthropology, archaeology/prehistory, linguistic anthropology and applied anthropology.
1.Demonstrate anthropology as a science and a humanistic discipline; understand its breadth, especially its interest in global diversity.
2.Assess the role of five major subfields in anthropology in understanding humans spatially and temporally.
3.Apply anthropology to vital issues and new challenges facing humans such as the genetic modification of food, cloning, resurrection of extinct species, direction of human evolution etc.
B.Examine the basic conceptual ideas in physical anthropology concerning the scientific method, the theory of evolution, the role of culture and the determinants of primate behavior.
1.Apply the scientific method to the study of humans
2.Examine human biological characteristics and behavior. Also differentiate between culturally and biologically determined behaviors as an adaptation to the environment.
3.Recognize the role and importance of culture in the success of human societies functioning in diverse environmental situations.
4.Examine the historical background and foundations of the evolutionary theory. Understand how the process of evolution works.
5.Comparison of evolutionary theory with traditional views of diverse societies on the origin of the natural world
C.Examine the biological background for physical anthropology in terms of biochemistry, genetics, adaptation, and molecular biology. Apply the understanding of evolutionary theory to medicine.
1.Discuss the structure of DNA, protein synthesis, and the significance of mutations in evolution
2.Assess biochemical evidence for evolution, that is, differences in DNA and proteins of different species, the "molecular clock"
3.Examine the structure of a chromosome the role of cell division, and aberration in creating variation and evolution.
4.Apply Mendel's laws of inheritance to humans and in understanding of evolutionary theory. Evaluate examples of genetically-determined human traits in diverse parts of the world, including sickle-cell anemia, Tay-Sachs disease, and lactose intolerance
5.Outline animal adaptations and diversity in geological time, features of humans that are shared with other primates, other mammals, and other vertebrate animals
D.Assess the primatological information about the living primates by comparing primate anatomy, behavior, gender roles, social organization, reproduction and ecology and by noting their diversity, classification and geographic distribution.
1.Examine the diversity in the order primates including prosimians, monkeys, apes, and humans.
2.Illustrate geographic distribution and ecology of primates
3.Examine variations in primate behavior, locomotion, reproductive strategies, social organization, and gender roles in primates
4.Evaluate the anatomy and locomotor adaptations of primates including special characteristics of human anatomy
E.Analyze the fossil record of humanity by examining the evidence, questions, hypotheses, and controversies concerning human evolution in the light of current information on genetics, evolutionary processes, molecular evidence of evolution, and anatomy and behavior of living primates.
1.Reconstruct the important stages in the evolution of Homo sapiens
a.The earliest hominids from Sahelanthropus Tchadchadensis to Australopithecus.
b.The rise of genus Homo: Homo habilis and Homo erectus
c.The Neanderthals and other archaic Homo sapiens
2.Critically examine questions and controversies involving the interpretation of fossil hominids and associated artifacts, and the determination of their interrelationships
3.Evaluate hypotheses on assessing and interpreting the evidence about hominid culture
a.Importance of behavior and subsistence patterns
b.Social organization, rearing of young, and gender roles
c.Development of technology
F.Examine the emergence and transformations of human culture over time, recognizing the various ancient cultural sources for modern human society.
1.Earliest cultural behavior: living spaces and tool technologies
2.Homo habilis and Homo erectus: developing culture-based lifeways
3.Cultural behaviors of the Paleolithic peoples: evidence and interpretations
4.Ancient cultural sources for modern human society: cognition and language
G.Evaluate the importance of the environment in human success and evolution; Critically analyze the past and present impact of the environment on human populations and predict possible future outcomes for our species based on the present trends in environmental change.
1.Evaluate the role of environmental factors in explaining human variation and evolution
2.Examine the role of past environmental effects of humans
3.Assess present environmental effects resulting from modern technology
4.Predict future possibilities depending on directions chosen now

VI. Assignments

A.Oral
1.Small group discussion of course content (articles and textual material)
2.Individual and/or small group presentations on selected topics of course material (genetic engineering, human cloning, behavior and biology, endangered primates, disappearance of the Neanderthals etc.)
3.In-class debates on topical controversies, at instructor's option.(Are we ready to play God, Race an illusion or a reality? Behavior: a complex interaction between nature and nurture etc.)
4.Student facilitation of classroom discussions under instructor’s supervision (instructor’s option)
B.Reading
1.Synthesis of assigned readings from the required texts and other sources.
2.Suggested supplemental readings.
C.Writing
1.Assignments involving critical analysis of current literature and DVDs within the realm of physical anthropology.
2.Students will write an analytical paper based on fieldwork and research. They will evaluate and select sources, critically analyze data, synthesize information, and formulate conclusions.
D.Preparation of exhibit material: Students will develop an educational exhibit to teach fellow students about aspects of physical anthropology.

VII. Methods of Instruction

 Lecture and multimedia aids
Discussion of assigned reading
Field observation and field trips
Guest speakers
Collaborative learning and small group exercises
Collaborative projects
Laboratory and field research experience which involve students in formal exercises of data collection and analysis
Discussion and problem solving performed in class
Exploration of Internet and digital resources
Homework and extended projects

VIII. Methods of Evaluating Objectives

A.Midterm examinations composed of objective and/or essay questions
B.Writing assignments involving summary, synthesis and critical analysis of readings and data (research paper and journals on the articles read).
C.Final examination composed of objective and/or essay questions that will require students to demonstrate the ability to summarize, integrate, and critically analyze information and to apply important concepts examined throughout the course.
D.Participation in and contribution toward classroom discussions, group and individual presentations and in class collaborative work.
E.Display and exhibit material: Students will develop an educational exhibit to teach fellow students about aspects of physical anthropology.

IX. Texts and Supporting References

A.Examples of Primary Texts and References
1.Jurmain, R., Kilgore, L., Trevathan, W. Essentials in Physical Anthropology. 9th ed. Thomson Wadsworth. 2013.
2.Fuentes, Agustin. Biological Anthropology: Concepts and Connections. 2nd ed. McGraw-Hill.2012
3.Park, M. Biological Anthropology. 7th ed. McGraw Hill. 2013
4.Relenthford, John H. The Human Species - An Introduction to Biological Anthropology. 9th ed. McGraw Hill. 2013.
5.Stein, Philip L. & Rowe, Bruce M. Physical Anthropology, 11th ed. McGraw Hill 2014.
B.Examples of Supporting Texts and References
1.Stanford C, Allen J, and Anton S. Biological Anthropology. 3rd Ed. Pearson. 2012.
2.Angeloni, E. (ed.) Annual Editions Physical Anthropology. 23rd ed. McGraw-Hill 2013.
3.Angeloni, E., Pritchard, P., Arenson, L. Physical Anthropology: Roundtable Viewpoints. McGraw Hill, NY, 2009
4.Boaz, Noel T & Almquist Alan J. "Biological Anthropology - A Synthetic Approach to Human Evolution." Prentice Hall. 2002
5.Brace, L.C., Race is a Four Letter Word. Oxford University Press. Oxford, 2005
6.Burton, Frances The Multimedia Guide to Non-Human Primates. Prentice Hall 1995.
7.Campbell, C.J., et. al. Primates in Perspective, 2nd ed. Oxford University Press, 2010
8.Ciochon, Russell and John G. Fleagle. The Human Evolution Sourcebook. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1993.
9.Fagan, Brian M. Ancient Lives: An Introduction to Archaeology and Prehistory. 5th ed. Prentice Hall, New York. 2012
10.France, Diane L. Lab Manual and Workbook for Physical Anthropology. Thomson Wadsworth. 2007.
11.Goodall, Jane. Through A Window. Boston; Houghton Mifflin Co., 1990.
12.Johanson, Donald and Edgar Blake. From Lucy to Language. Simon and Schuster 2006.
13.Larsen, Clark Spencer. Our Origins: Discovering Physical Anthropology. 2nd ed. Norton.2010
14.Lewontin, R. The Triple Helix: Gene, Organism, and Environment. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000.
15.Mielke, J. H., Konigsberg, L.W., Relethford, J.H., Human Biological Variation. 2nd ed. Oxford University Press, 2010
16.Molnar, S. Human Variation, 6th ed. Races, Types and Ethnic Groups. Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006
17.Montagu, Ashley. Man's Most Dangerous Myth: The Fallacy of Race. 6th ed. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press 1997.
18.Stringer, Christopher and Robin Mckie. African Exodus: The Origins of Modern Humanity. Henry Holt 1998.
19.Stringer, Chris, and Clive Gamble. In Search of the Neanderthals. New York: Thames and Hudson, 1993.
20.Sussman, Robert W. The Biological Basis of Human Behavior. Prentice Hall, 1999.
21.Tattersall, Ian. The Fossil Trail: How We know What We Think We Know about Human Evolution. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995
22.Tattersall. Becoming Human. Oxford University Press. 1998.
23.Trinkaus, Erik, and Pat Shipman. The Neandertals: Changing the Image of Mankind. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1992.
24.Walker A. & Shipman P. The Wisdom of the Bones: In Search of Human Origins. Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London, 1996.
25.Whitehead, Paul, William Sacco and Susan Hochgraf. A Photographic Atlas for Physical Anthropology. 2nd ed. Morton. 2012