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Credit- Degree applicable
Effective Quarter: Fall 2012

I. Catalog Information

EWRT 1A
Composition and Reading
5 Unit(s)

 

(See general education pages for the requirement this course meets.)

Requisites: Prerequisite: English Writing 211 and Reading 211 (or Language Arts 211); or equivalent placement (normally based on results of the English Placement Tests).

Hours: Five hours lecture (60 hours total per quarter).

Description: Introduction to university level reading and writing, with an emphasis on analysis. Close examination of a variety of texts (personal, popular, literary, professional, academic) from culturally diverse traditions. Practice in common rhetorical strategies used in academic writing. Composition of clear, well-organized, and well-developed essays, with varying purposes and differing audiences, from personal to academic.


Student Learning Outcome Statements (SLO)

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Practice writing as a multi-step process including planning and revising with attention to varying purposes, audiences, and rhetorical strategies.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Read and analyze rhetorically and culturally diverse narrative and expository texts from a variety of perspectives.


II. Course Objectives

A.Examine the various forms of discourse, read culturally and rhetorically diverse narrative and expository texts and analyze them from a variety of perspectives.
B.Generate ideas and topics for essays; compose essays with varying purposes and audiences; formulate and support theses; integrate and organize ideas; develop a personal style/voice appropriate to purpose and audience, identify and practice common rhetorical strategies for academic writing, and engage in a multi-step writing process, with particular attention to planning and revision.

III. Essential Student Materials

 None

IV. Essential College Facilities

 None

V. Expanded Description: Content and Form

A.Examine the various forms of discourse, read culturally and rhetorically diverse narrative and expository texts and analyze them from a variety of perspectives.
1.Examine various forms of discourse:
1.Language vs. nonverbal communication
2.Language vs. nonverbal communication
3.Language vs. nonverbal communication
a.Language vs. nonverbal communication
b.Oral vs. written modes of discourse
c.Narrative vs. expository/analytical writing
d.Visual and verbal modes of expression (in advertising, news, etc.) (media literacy)
e.Popular stories and literature
f.Personal and academic writing
g.Textbooks and scholarly writing
2.Read rhetorically and culturally diverse texts and analyze them from a variety of perspectives such as:
a.Ethnicity and culture
b.Social class
c.Gender and sexual orientation
d.Historical context
e.Political position
f.Rhetorical purpose and audience
B.Generate ideas and topics for essays; compose essays with varying purposes and audiences; formulate and support theses; integrate and organize ideas; develop a personal style/voice appropriate to purpose and audience, identify and practice common rhetorical strategies for academic writing, and engage in a multi-step writing process, with particular attention to planning and revision.
1.Generate ideas and topics for essays by methods such as:
a.Brainstorming
b.Freewriting
c.Visual structures (clustering, mapping, trees)
d.Lists and outlines
e.Response journals (reading logs)
2.Compose essays with varying purposes, audiences, and rhetorical strategies, from personal to academic:
a.Reflective essays based on personal experiences, reading, etc.
b.Essays which may require rhetorical activities in combination such as defining, summarizing, comparing, classifying
c.Analytical, interpretive, or argumentative essays
3.Formulate and support theses:
a.Relationship between main idea and supporting points
b.Types of evidence
c.Illustrative examples and details
d.Acknowledgment of alternative positions
4.Integrate and organize ideas through devices such as:
a.Repetition of key words
b.Pronouns
c.Transitional words and phrases
d.Summary, paraphrase, or direct quotation of ideas from other sources
5.Develop personal style/voice appropriate to purpose and audience through activities such as:
a.Oral presentations; role-playing
b.Collaborative analysis of texts and issues; collaborative writing; active listening
c.Writing rhetorically diverse essays; peer review
6.Identify and practice common rhetorical strategies used in academic writing such as:
a.Defining
b.Summarizing
c.Serializing (sequential relationships)
d.Classifying
e.Comparing
f.Analyzing (theoretical perspectives)
7.Practice writing as a multistep process with particular attention to planning and revision:
a.Generating ideas
b.Collecting information
c.Planning, organizing
d.Drafting
e.Getting feedback (peer review)
f.Revising
g.Proofreading, editing

VI. Assignments

A.Reading (rhetorically and culturally diverse texts, approx. 300-700 total pages, including:)
1.A substantial amount of challenging, college-level reading
2.At least one book-length work
3.A guide to rhetoric and usage, as desired
B.Writing (at least 6000 words of rhetorically diverse writing assignments)
1.At least one in-class essay or essay-based midterm (or equivalent limited-time writing assignment for Distance Education)
2.A sequence of at least four out-of-class essays, with varying purposes and differing audiences, from personal to academic
3.Final exam (predominantly essay)
C.Optional additional assignments that support course objectives, such as:
1.Oral presentations
2.Informal, exploratory writing (journals)

VII. Methods of Instruction

 Lecture and visual aids
Discussion of assigned reading
Discussion of student writing
In-class writing
In-class exploration of internet sites
Quiz and examination review performed in class
Homework and extended projects
Field observation, field trips, and service learning
Guest speakers
Collaborative learning and small group exercises

VIII. Methods of Evaluating Objectives

A.Essays, as listed in Assignments above, carefully evaluated according to clarity/correctness, organization/coherence, and development/depth (at least 75% of final grade to be based on written work)
B.Final exam - essay(s) evaluated according to criteria listed above (at least 75% of final grade to be based on written work)
C.Quizzes (e.g., to monitor reading) and other exams to evaluate ability to analyze critically, discuss and respond effectively to discourse and diverse rhetorical texts.
D.Class participation, including activities such as oral presentations, small-group activities and projects, and class discussions and debates to evaluate ability to analyze critically, discuss and respond effectively to discourse and diverse rhetorical texts.

IX. Texts and Supporting References

A.Required Texts
1.*George, Diana, and John Trimbur. "Reading Culture: Contexts for Critical Reading and Writing", 6th Edition. New York: Longman, 2006.
2.Lunsford, Andrea A. "EasyWriter", 4th Edition. New York: Bedford/ St.Martin's Press, 2009.
B.Supporting Texts and References
1.Colombo, Gary, Robert Cullen, and Bonnie Lisle. "Rereading America: Cultural Contexts for Critical Thinking and Writing". 7th Edition. New York: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2007.
2.Ford, Marjorie, and Jon Ford. "Dreams and Inward Journeys". 6th Edition. New York: Longman, 2006.
3.LaGuardia, Dolores, and Hans P. Guth. "American Voices: Culture and Community". 6th Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005.
4.Lunsford, Andrea A., and John J. Ruszkiewicz. "The Presence of Others", 4th Edition. New York: Bedford/ St.Martin's Press, 2005.
5.Maasik, Sonia, and J. Fisher Solomon. "California Dreams and Realities: Readings for Critical Thinkers and Writers". 2nd Edition. New York: St. Martin's, 2004.
6.Rosenwasser, David, and Jill Stephen. "Writing Analytically". New York: Harcourt Brace, 2005.
7.Scholes, Robert, Janice Peritz, and Nancy R. Conley. "The Practice of Writing". 5th Edition. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
8.Stanford, Judith. "Connections: A Multicultural Reader for Writers", 2nd Edition. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield, 2006.
9.Boyle, T. Coraghessan. "The Tortilla Curtain". New York: Penguin, 1996.
10.Castillo, Ana. "So Far From God". New York: W.W. Norton, 1993.
11.Douglass, Frederick. "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave". Ed. Houston A. Baker, Jr. New York: Penguin, 1985.
12.Erdrich, Louise. "Love Medicine". New York: Bantam, 1984.
13.Jin, Ha. "In the Pond". New York: Vintage, 2000.
14.Kingston, Maxine Hong. "Woman Warrior". New York: Vintage, 1990.
15.Lahiri, Jhumpa. "The Interpreter of Maladies". New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1999.
16.McBride, James. "The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother". New York: Riverhead, 1997.
17.Morrison, Toni. Sula. New York: Plume, 2002.
18.Ozeki, Ruth L. "My Year of Meats". New York: Viking, 1999.
19.Pham, Andrew X. "Catfish and Mandala". New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1999.
20.Ramirez, Juan. "A Patriot After All". Albuquerque: Univ. of New Mexico Press, 1999.
21.Rodriguez, Richard. "Hunger of Memory: The Education of Richard Rodriguez". New York: Bantam, 1983.
22.Woolf, Tobias. "This Boy's Life". New York: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1989.
23.Hacker, Diana. A Writer's Reference. 6th ed. New York: Bedford/St.Martin's, 2007.
24.Elbow, Peter. "Writing Without Teachers". London: Oxford, 1998.
25.Shaughnessy, Mina. "Errors and Expectations: A Guide for the Teacher of Basic Writing". London: Oxford, 1979.