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Credit- Degree applicable
Effective Quarter: Fall 2016

I. Catalog Information

NUTR 10
Contemporary Nutrition
4 Unit(s)

 

(See general education pages for the requirement this course meets.)

Requisites: Advisory: EWRT 1A or EWRT 1AH or ESL 5.

Hours: Lec Hrs: 48.00
Out of Class Hrs: 96.00
Total Student Learning Hrs: 144.00

CAN:

Description: Introductory level nutrition. Relationship of nutrients to health and physical fitness. Physiological, cultural, psychological and economic influences on food choices. Evaluation of current nutritional issues and controversies.


Student Learning Outcome Statements (SLO)

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Evaluate a meal plan or diet for meeting the criteria of a " Healthy Diet"


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Evaluate nutrition claims about dietary supplement, food, or diet for accuracy and health enhancing potential.


II. Course Objectives

A.Distinguish between reliable nutrition information and popular claims.
B.Explain criteria of a "healthy diet"; psychological, cultural, environmental and economic influences on the implementation of a healthy diet.
C.Describe the general physiological principles of nutrition
D.Outline the concept of energy balance; its relationship to body weight.
E.Evaluate the role of diet on fitness, health and chronic diseases throughout the life cycle.
F.Outline the major functions of the nutrients; identify food sources of the macronutrients and micronutrients; evaluate the choices based on psychological, cultural and economic considerations.
G.Critically evaluate contemporary nutritional issues and apply to personal attitudes about food choices.

III. Essential Student Materials

 Simple calculator

IV. Essential College Facilities

 None

V. Expanded Description: Content and Form

A.Distinguish between reliable nutrition information and popular claims.
1.Types of human nutrition research studies (epidemiological, clinical trials); criteria for validity of experimental studies.
2.Criteria for evaluating nutrition information
a.Key features of DSHEA (Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act); role of the FDA (Food and Drug Administration); Health Claims and Structure-Function Claims.
b.Identification of biased and unbiased sources of nutrition information; evaluation of websites.
c."Red Flags" of "junk science".
B.Explain criteria of a "healthy diet"; psychological, cultural, environmental and economic influences on the implementation of a healthy diet.
1.Overview of the nutrients and other dietary components such as fiber, phytochemicals and alcohol.
2.The spectrum of nutritional status - undernutrition, optimal nutrition, overnutrition
a.Guidelines from other countries, cultures, and types of diets (Mediterranean diet, Asian Pyramid, Vegetarian Pyramid, etc.).
b.Tools for evaluating and planning a healthy diet (MyPlate, The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, The Dietary Reference Intakes).
c.Understanding and use of food labels
d.Factors influencing food choices (availability, convenience, income, advertising, etc.)
C.Describe the general physiological principles of nutrition
1.Overview of digestion, absorption and metabolism.
a.Common digestive problems such as lactose intolerance, heartburn and indigestion.
b.Popular myths about digestion
2.Food as fuel; energy values of the macronutrients; energy calculations.
3.Overview of blood sugar homeostasis; glycemic response; glycemic index and popular claims
D.Outline the concept of energy balance; its relationship to body weight.
1.Food intake regulation
a.Definition of hunger, satiety, satiation and appetite
b.Environmental influences, the food industry, "portion distortion"
2.Energy expenditure
a.The three components of energy expenditure
b.Factors that influence basal metabolism
c.The role of exercise and activity
3.Definition and causes of obesity
a.Role of genetic, cultural, environmental and social factors
b.Current methods of measuring obesity, body composition and distribution of body fat
c.Impact of culture on standards of weight and body image
4.Methods of weight loss: diets, surgery, medication, dietary supplements and other.
a.Definition and identification of "fad diets"
b.Criteria for evaluating weight loss diets and products
E.Evaluate the role of diet on fitness, health and chronic diseases throughout the life cycle.
1.Definition of genetic disease, genetic predisposition, chronic disease and lifestyle risk factors
2.The impact of diet, exercise and other lifestyle choices on health
a.Cardiovascular disease and hypertension
b.Diabetes
c.Cancer
d.Osteoporosis
3.The role of diet and nutrition on physical fitness
4.Unique nutrient needs at different stages of the lifecycle
F.Outline the major functions of the nutrients; identify food sources of the macronutrients and micronutrients; evaluate the choices based on psychological, cultural and economic considerations.
1.The macronutrients; basic functions, major foods sources, impact on health.
a.Quality and quantity of carbohydrate in the diet
b.Quality and quantity of fat in the diet
c.Quality and quantity of protein in the diet.
1.Protein supplements
2.Vegetarian diets
d.Water; optimal fluid intakes; effects of dehydration.
2.The micronutrients (selected examples at the discretion of the instructor); basic functions, major foods sources, impact on health.
3.Dietary supplements: popular claims, benefits, risks and appropriate uses; selected examples at the discretion of the instructor
4.Criteria for selection of practical food sources based on cultural, psychological, economic and health factors.
G.Critically evaluate contemporary nutritional issues and apply to personal attitudes about food choices.
1.The prevalence of fast food; its impact on individual health, family structure, culture and society
2.The roles of the food industry, the government (federal, state, local levels) and personal responsibility on food choices and their consequences on health.
3.Food safety (food poisoning, mercury and fish, etc.).
4.Alternative nutrition; critically evaluating non-mainstream approaches to achieving health
5.Additional issues at the discretion of the instructor, such as food additives, caffeine, energy drinks, eating disorders, organic foods, genetically engineered foods, the environmental impact of food choices, food security and hunger, etc.

VI. Assignments

A.Required reading assignments
B.Comprehensive analysis of student's diet
C.Written evaluation of an assessment of student's diet
D.Additional assignments at the discretion of the instructor: Oral reports (on popular diets, dietary supplements,"super foods", other), in-class debates (on pro/con vegetarian diets, other), Internet-based activities (evaluating websites for reliability of information, evaluating advertisements for nutritional products, other), and group projects (creating concept maps, designing diet guidelines, other)

VII. Methods of Instruction

 Lecture and visual aids
Discussion of assigned reading
Discussion and problem solving performed in class
Collaborative learning and small group exercises
Quiz and examination review performed in class
Homework and extended projects

VIII. Methods of Evaluating Objectives

A.At least three objective exams that assess the basic concepts as well as the ability to apply this information to higher level questions
B.Graded evaluation of nutritional analysis of student's diet for thoroughness, precision and accuracy.
C.Graded evaluation of the written dietary assessment demonstrating the ability to interpret the nutritional analysis and apply to the criteria of a "healthy diet".
D.Evaluation of any additional assignments for demonstration of accurately integrating and synthesizing concepts of nutrition using critical thinking skills.

IX. Texts and Supporting References

A.Examples of Primary Texts and References
1.* Insel, Paul, Turner, R. Elaine, Ross, Don. "Discovering Nutrition", 5th ed., Jones and Barlett 2015.
2.Grosvenor, Mary B. and Smolin, Lori A. "Nutrition Everyday Choices", 1st ed., John Wiley & Sons, 2006.
3.Brown, Judith E. "Nutrition Now", 7th ed., Thomson Wadsworth 2014.
4.Sizer, Frances, Whitney, Eleanor. "Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies", 13th ed. Thomson Wadsworth 2014.
B.Examples of Supporting Texts and References
1.Critser, Greg. "Fatland; How Americans Became the Fattest People in The World". Houghton Mifflin, Co., 2003.
2.Fragakis, Allison Sarubin. "The Health Professional's Guide to Popular Dietary Supplements", 3rd ed., The American Dietetic Association, 2006.
3.Kessler,David. The End of Overeating; Taking Control of the Insatiable American Appetite. (2009)
4.Nestle, Marion. "Food Politics; How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health", Grove Press, 2003.
5.Pollan, Michael. "The Omnivore's dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals." Penguin Press. 2007.
6.Schlosser, Eric. "Fast Food Nation; The Dark Side of the All American Meal", Houghton Mifflin, Co. 2001.
7.Pollan, Michael. "In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto." Penguin Press. 2008.
8.Video: "Supersize Me".
9.Video: "Frontline: Alternative Fix".
10.Video: Peter Jennings Reports: How to Get Fat; the role of the government and industry on the obesity epidemic.
11.www.fitday.com (free dietary analysis website)
12.http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/ (Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015)
13.Video: Food, Inc. 2009.
14.http://www.eatright.org/Public/ (Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Website)
15.http://www.choosemyplate.gov/ (MyPlate Guidelines)
16.Roach, Mary. "Gulp: Adventures in the Alimentary Canal". W. & W. Norton & Company. 2013.
17.Video: "Fresh: New Thinking About What We're Eating." 2009.