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Credit- Not degree applicable
Effective Quarter: Fall 2014

I. Catalog Information

EWRT 211
Preparatory Writing Skills
5 Unit(s)

 

Requisites: Prerequisite: English Writing 200 and Reading 200 (or Language Arts 200); or a qualifying score on the English Placement Test.

Formerly:

Repeatability:

Hours: Five hours lecture (60 hours total per quarter).

Description: Develops the abilities necessary for college-level writing by introducing students to critical thinking via text-based analysis. Essay construction including thesis statements and paragraph organization and development, as well as focusing on the mechanics of writing, such as sentence-level skills will be covered.


Student Learning Outcome Statements (SLO)

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Demonstrate ability to respond critically to one’s own and others’ experiences and ideas.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Develop clear sequential relationship between supporting ideas and central argument/controlling idea in writing.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Demonstrate evidence of strong synthesis, argumentation, analysis, and/or problem-solving skills in writing.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Apply basic research and documentation skills.


II. Course Objectives

A.Analyze a variety of college-level texts with a focus predominantly on expository.
B.Develop critical thinking analysis of topics and ideas for essays.
C.Compose and support thesis statements for analytical essays.
D.Develop organization ideas in essays that move towards expository structure with an emphasis on writing analytical essays.
E.Identify and practice writing for different audiences and purposes.
F.Develop and demonstrate a variety of rhetorical strategies to develop strong rhetorical analysis in essays.
G.Demonstrate writing as a multi-step process with particular attention to planning and revision.
H.Practice composing organized, developed, analytical essays that increase in complexity.
I.Demonstrate proofreading for recurrent usage and sentence-level errors.

III. Essential Student Materials

 None

IV. Essential College Facilities

 None

V. Expanded Description: Content and Form

A.Analyze a variety of college-level texts with a focus predominantly on expository.
1.Texts from a wide range of perspectives representing different genders, classes, sexual orientations, religious beliefs, ethnic backgrounds, political positions, and across generations
2.Texts of varying complexity
3.Texts with a variety of rhetorical purposes and audiences which may include essays, arguments, stories, novels and poems.
B.Develop critical thinking analysis of topics and ideas for essays.
1.Practicing a variety of pre-writing strategies - free-writing, journal writing, brainstorming, clustering
2.Participating in class discussions and activities to generate material
C.Compose and support thesis statements for analytical essays.
1.Learning the relationship between controlling idea and supporting points
2.Gathering different types of evidence
3.Presenting examples and details
4.Acknowledging alternative positions
D.Develop organization ideas in essays that move towards expository structure with an emphasis on writing analytical essays.
1.Developing the thesis statement/controlling idea
2.Organizing sentences and paragraphs in a logical order
E.Identify and practice writing for different audiences and purposes.
1.Writing for different communities (i.e. fellow students, the wider campus community, a local newspaper, a congressperson, a potential employer)
2.Learning to compose for different purposes (i.e. writing to explore, writing to explain, writing to persuade)
F.Develop and demonstrate a variety of rhetorical strategies to develop strong rhetorical analysis in essays.
1.Narrative
2.Summary
3.Definition
4.Analysis
5.Compare and contrast
6.Argument
G.Demonstrate writing as a multi-step process with particular attention to planning and revision.
1.Generating ideas
2.Collecting information
3.Reading for writing
4.Planning and organizing
5.Getting feedback (peer review)
6.Revising
7.Editing and proofreading
H.Practice composing organized, developed, analytical essays that increase in complexity.
1.Beginning with assignments that are more concrete (summaries, narratives, short analysis papers, letters to the editor)
2.Moving towards more complex writing tasks that require abstract or analytical thinking (argumentative and analytical essays)
I.Demonstrate proofreading for recurrent usage and sentence-level errors.
1.Practicing different proofreading techniques
2.Identifying, with the instructor's guidance, frequent errors and ways to correct them

VI. Assignments

A.At least five essays in an instructor-designed sequence
B.At least three of the essay assignments based on the reading of appropriate texts with basic quotation and in-text citation included and requiring basic analytical skills
C.Of these five essays, at least two short essays written under teacher supervision in the classroom.
D.The final must be the portfolio, which consists of: the reflective essay, an in-class essay that has not been revised, and an analytical essay that can be revised.

VII. Methods of Instruction

 Lecture and visual aids
Discussion of assigned reading
In-class essays
In-class exploration of Internet sites
Quiz and examination review performed in class
Homework and extended projects
Collaborative learning and small group exercises
Collaborative projects

VIII. Methods of Evaluating Objectives

A.Assessment of student incorporation of instructor feedback in revisions of current essay and application of revision strategies to subsequent assignments.
B.Homework, quizzes, journals, assigned postings to class websites and other means of evaluating student responses to class topics and readings.
C.Presentations, Group Work, Class Discussions and other activities designed to assess students participation in the class and with other students.
D.Assessment of student writing in the three essays submitted in the final portfolio, which serves as the class final and is evaluated according to the current Portfolio Guidelines approved by the English Department and available from the Portfolio Coordinator.

IX. Texts and Supporting References

A.Examples of Primary Texts and References
1.Atwan, Robert. "America Now", 7th ed. Boston: Bedford St. Martin's Press, 2007.
2.Divakaruni, Chitra Banerjee. "Multitude", 2nd ed. McGraw-Hill, 1997.
3.Birkenstein, Cathy & Gerald Graff. They Say, I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2009. Print.
4.Gillespie, Sheena and Robert Singleton, Eds. "Across Cultures", 5th ed. Longman Publishers, 2001.
5.Goshgarian, Gary. "The Contemporary Reader", 7th ed. Longman Publishers, 2002.
B.Examples of Supporting Texts and References
1.The Easy Writer by Andrea Lunsford 5th edition (or most current)
2.A college level dictionary such as "Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary." 11th Edition. Springfield, MA: G. & C. Merriam CO., 2002
3."Capital Community College Guide to Grammar and Writing" - http://ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/
4."De Anza's Online Writing Center" - http://faculty.deanza.fhda.edu/writingcenter/
5."Purdue's On-line Writing Lab" - http://owl.english.purdue.edu
6."Assignment Design and Writing Across the Curriculum" -
http://staff.jccc.net/pmcqueen/Teaching/teaching_with_writing.htm
7."Articles on Portfolios and Assessment" -
http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/cwp/lib/apbib.html
8."Conference of Basic Writing e-Journal" - http://www.asu.edu/clas/english/composition/cbw/journal_1.htm
9."Center for Research on Developmental Education and Urban Literacy" - http://www.gen.umn.edu/research/crdeul/
10."De Anza's Developmental Taskforce" -
http://faculty.deanza.fhda.edu/taskforce/
11."National Association for Developmental Education" -
http://www.nade.net/
12."Teaching Expository Writing: An Online Guide" -
http://www.gslis.utexas.edu/~vlibrary/edres/pathfinders/pinard/bib.htm