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Credit- Degree applicable
Effective Quarter: Fall 2017

I. Catalog Information

ICS 17
Critical Consciousness and Social Change
4 Unit(s)

 

(See general education pages for the requirement this course meets.)

Requisites: (Not open to students with credit in ICS 17H.)

Advisory: EWRT 1A or EWRT 1AH or ESL 5.

Hours: Lec Hrs: 48.00
Out of Class Hrs: 96.00
Total Student Learning Hrs: 144.00

Also Listed As:

Description: An exploration of issues related to social change including the development of ways of thinking that promote social change. Students will read classical and contemporary authors on movements for social change, strategies for organizing, and the development of consciousness.


Student Learning Outcome Statements (SLO)

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Identify and analyze the philosophical problems pertaining to critical consciousness and social change.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Analyze and assess solutions to these problems from a variety of traditions.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Articulate and defend student's own position on at least one issue related to social change.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Demonstrate an application of these tools to student's own actions and decisions.


II. Course Objectives

A.Study the basic methods used in philosophy and intercultural studies and the ways these methods are used to study social change.
B.Analyze the essential principles of social action.
C.Analyze the relationship between environmental sustainability and human flourishing
D.Analyze the particular moral and social issues of most immediate concern to the thinkers being considered.
E.Investigate the history of social movements and what they have accomplished

III. Essential Student Materials

 None

IV. Essential College Facilities

 None

V. Expanded Description: Content and Form

A.Study the basic methods used in philosophy and intercultural studies and the ways these methods are used to study social change.
1.Investigate what is Philosophy its methods.
2.Investigate what is Intercultural Studies its methods.
3.Study the role of theories of social change in each of these disciplines.
B.Analyze the essential principles of social action.
1.Review historical contexts in which social action movements have arisen, such as: anti-colonial and Third World national liberation movements; feminism in the US and worldwide; the civil rights movement in the US; queer liberation movements; the disability rights movement.
2.Study general theoretical frameworks for analysis of moral and philosophical issues of social change.
3.Explore culturally diverse ways of understanding oppression and liberation, such as the different ways that feminist issues are understood in different societies.
4.Examine concepts of and perspectives on class, race gender, and the environment.
C.Analyze the relationship between environmental sustainability and human flourishing
1.Analyze the root causes of a lack of sustainability in society
2.Analyze the ways that societies needs to be changed to have them be sustainable
3.Analyze the movements that are working to build a sustainable society
D.Analyze the particular moral and social issues of most immediate concern to the thinkers being considered.
1.Review the historical and cultural features of the social struggles in which each of the writers developed their thinking.
2.Analyze the central tensions involved in each of these struggles for social change. What were (or are) the specific moral and social issues involved?
3.Compare and contrast how each of these thinkers participated in a social movement with others and how their thinking distinguished them from others in the same struggle for social change.
E.Investigate the history of social movements and what they have accomplished
1.Study the history of Nineteenth century struggles.
2.Investigate the movements of the latter part of the twentieth century United States, and how those movements interrelated with one another, and what their legacies have been.
3.Analyze the present moment, for an understanding of the conditions that make social change easier foster and those that make it harder.

VI. Assignments

A.Reading.
1.Assigned weekly readings from texts and other sources that help students identify and analyze the philosophical problems pertaining to critical consciousness and social change and that help them explore solutions to these problems from a variety of traditions.
2.Critical reading of journal articles.
3.Suggested supplemental readings.
4.Library research for final project.
B.Writing.
1.Critical essays on assigned texts that ask students to articulate and defend their own position on at least one issue related to social change.
2.Weekly think sheets on key concepts in assigned reading and class lectures, at least one of which will ask students to demonstrate an application of these tools to their own actions and decisions.
3.A final written project, which synthesizes information from a variety of sources and makes a substantial argument.
C.Oral
1.Participation in small group discussions of assigned texts and special projects.
2.Participation in large group discussions of course materials.
D.Practical
1.This class requires 12 hours of practical experience
2.Students will write reflective journals that demonstrate an application of the tools learned in the class to their own actions and decisions.

VII. Methods of Instruction

 Lecture and visual aids
Discussion of assigned reading
Discussion and problem solving performed in class
Homework and extended projects
Collaborative learning and small group exercises
Lecture and visual aids
Discussion of assigned reading
Homework and extended projects
Collaborative learning and small group exercises

VIII. Methods of Evaluating Objectives

A.Grading of reflection journals on practical experience to test for depth of personal reflection and an ability to put ideas learned into the framework of personal experience.
B.Weekly think sheets to test critical understanding of the assigned readings.
C.Participation in and contribution to class discussions.
D.Midterm and final essay examinations to test for recognition, identification, synthesis and analysis of key concepts.
E.Papers and final project to test for understanding of main concepts studied and for ability to analyze social issues.

IX. Texts and Supporting References

A.Examples of Primary Texts and References
1.*Cynthia Kaufman, "Ideas for Action: Relevant Theory for Radical Change". Cambridge, PM Press, second edition 2016
2.*Paulo Freire, "Pedagogy of the Oppressed". New York: Continuum, 2003.
B.Examples of Supporting Texts and References
1.Robert K. Schaeffer. "Social Movements and Global Social Change: The Rising Tide." New York: Rowman Litlefield, 2014.
2.Bill Moyer, "Doing Democracy", Gabriola Island, B.C.: New Society Publishers, 2001.
3.Eddie Yuen, Daniel-Burton-Rose, and George Katsiaficas, "Confronting Capitalism", New York; Soft Skull Press, 2004.
4.David Solnit. Globalize Liberation.San Francisco: City Lights, 2003.
5.Frantz Fanon, "The Wretched of the Earth". New York: Grove Press, 2005..
6.Gloria Anzaldua, "Borderlands". San Francisco: Spinster s/Aunt Lute, 2007.
7.Frances Fox Piven,"Challenging Authority: How Ordinary People Change America." New York: Rowman Littlefield, 2008.
8.Luis Fischer, ed., "The Essential Gandhi: An Anthology of His Writings on His Life, Work, and Ideas." New York: Vintage Press, 2002.