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Credit- Degree applicable
Effective Quarter: Fall 2017

I. Catalog Information

WMST 21
Women in Literature
4 Unit(s)

 

(See general education pages for the requirement this course meets.)

Requisites: Advisory: EWRT 1A or EWRT 1AH or ESL 5.

Hours: Four hours lecture (48 hours total per quarter).

Also Listed As: (Also listed as ELIT 21. Students may enroll in either department, but not both, for credit.)

Description: Intensive study of representative literary works by or about women including an analysis of different historical, cultural, and critical perspectives.


Student Learning Outcome Statements (SLO)

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Demonstrate understanding of a variety of literary texts by and about women.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Analyze influence of class, race and ethnicity, culture, abilities, and sexual orientation on women as writers, characters, subjects and leaders in literary texts.


II. Course Objectives

A.Interpret a variety of literary texts by and about women.
B.Distinguish the influences of class, race and ethnicity, culture, abilities, and sexual orientation on women as writers, characters, subjects and leaders of literary texts.
C.Analyze, evaluate and employ basic current approaches in literary criticism as they relate to women as writers, characters, subjects and readers of texts

III. Essential Student Materials

 None

IV. Essential College Facilities

 None

V. Expanded Description: Content and Form

A.Interpret a variety of literary texts by and about women.
1.Assigned readings will be drawn from various historical periods and different class, gender, sexual orientation and cultural perspectives
2.Assigned readings may include journals/diaries, autobiographies, essays, short stories, novels, plays and poems
3.Assigned readings will introduce students to a spectrum of current critical approaches to literary texts by and about women, such as: feminist criticism, psychoanalytic (Jungian) criticism, structuralism/semiotics, post-structuralism/deconstructionist, new-historicism, queer theory, post-colonial theory.
B.Distinguish the influences of class, race and ethnicity, culture, abilities, and sexual orientation on women as writers, characters, subjects and leaders of literary texts.
1.Compare and contrast the effects of a variety of influences on the development of textual characters and writers' voices based on information concerning historical period, class, culture, race, abilities, age/phase-of-life, and sexual orientation of writers and textual characters
2.Formulate hypotheses about the effects of class, culture, race, age, abilities, gender and sexual orientation on themselves as readers and interpreters of literary texts through careful examination and analysis of their own assumptions
3.Analyze the role of women in different historical periods with particular attention to the differences among the roles of Anglo-European women and women of color as well as differences among women of different classes and different sexual orientations to determine how these social, cultural and historical differences are reflected in and help to shape the literature of women from those periods
C.Analyze, evaluate and employ basic current approaches in literary criticism as they relate to women as writers, characters, subjects and readers of texts
1.Discuss, analyze, and synthesize the variety of contemporary critical positions (such as psychoanalytic criticism, cultural criticism, deconstructionist, post-colonial theory, queer theory) developed to address the intersections of class, race, ethnicity, culture, abilities, gender, and sexual orientation as they shape our literary values
2.Examine the changing perspectives on women writers and the current discussions and debates over the social construction of literary values
3.Formulate critical perspectives and construct analyses of the roles of women writers, characters, subjects and readers of literary texts through close explorations of the intersection of race, class, age, abilities, culture, gender and sexual orientation

VI. Assignments

A.Typically at least 50 pages per week of assigned readings of literary and critical texts.
B.Independent research on one or more of the authors read by the class to be presented in writing and/or in group presentation to the class.
C.At least 2,500 written words during the quarter. Of this total:
1.Approximately 1,000 must be an analytical and/or argumentative essay about one of the assigned authors and must demonstrate a critical analysis of primary materials and may also include synthesis and application of secondary critical materials
2.The remaining writing will be fulfilled in
a.A midterm and final exam/project and
b.A variety of activities such as reader response journals, reports, formal or informal student essays

VII. Methods of Instruction

 Discussion of assigned reading
Lecture and visual aids
In-class exploration of Internet sites
Collaborative learning and small group exercises
Collaborative projects

VIII. Methods of Evaluating Objectives

A.Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of critical paper(s) and final exam/project that demonstrate an understanding of complex issues which affect women as writers, characters and readers of literary texts
B.Students may also be evaluated on their performance on quizzes, midterm exam, oral presentations, creative/multimedia projects such as creative writings, videos, blogs/websites, and class participation--addressing course themes and objectives.

IX. Texts and Supporting References

A.Examples of Primary Texts and References
1.Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. 2006
2.Wilson, Sharon Rose. Myths and Fairy Tales in Contemporary Women's Fiction: From Atwood to Morrison. 2012
3.Cantu, Norma E., Olga Najera Ramirez. Chicana Traditions: continuity and change. University of Ilinois Press, 2002.
4.Gilbert, Sandra M. and Susan Gubar, eds. Norton Anthology of Literature by Women: The Tradition in English. W.W. Norton, 2007.
5.Martin, Wendy. More Stories We Tell: The Best Contemporary Short Stories by North American Women. Pantheon, 2004.
B.Examples of Supporting Texts and References
1.Bhavnani, Kum-Kum, ed. Feminism and Race. Oxford UP, 2001.
2.Thorsson, Courtney. Women's Work: Nationalism and Contemporary African American Women's Novels. 2013
3.Bow, Leslie. Betrayal and Other Acts of Subversion: Feminism, Sexual Politics, Asian American Women's Literature. Princeton University Press, 2001.
4.Smith, Zadie. Changing My Mind: Contemporary Essays. 2010.
5.Hashimi, Nadia. The Pearl That Broke It's Shell. 2014.
6.Schott, Joan Wallach. Women's Studies on the Edge. 2008.
7.Kolmer, Wendy and Frances Bartkowski. Feminist Theory: A Reader. 2013.
8.Chute, Hillary. Graphic Woman: Life Narratives and Contemporary Comics. 2010.
9.Hogeland, Lisa Marie, et al. The Aunt Lute Anthology of U.S. Women Writers, Vol 2: 20th Century. Aunt Lute Press, 2007
10.Morrison, Toni. Playing In The Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination. Vintage, 1993.
11.Parisi, Joseph and Welton, Kathleen. 100 Essential Modern Poems By Women. Ivan R. Dee, 2009
12.Simal, Begona & Marino, Elisabetta. Transnational, National, and Personal Voices: New Perspectives on Asian American and Asian Diasporic Women Writers. Lit Verlag, 2006.
13.Valenti, Jessica. Full Frontal Feminism: A Young Woman's Guide To Why Feminism Matters. Seal Press, 2007.
14.Moore, Lorrie. Bark. 2014.
15.Lee, Shaw. Women's Voices, Feminist Visions: Classic and Contemporary Readings. 2011
16.Ensler, Eve. The Vagina Monologues. 2007.
17.Morrison, Toni. Sula. 2004
18.Greenfield, Lauren. Thin. 2006.
19.Lahiri, Jhumpa. The Lowland. 2013
20.Lahiri, Jhumpa. The Interpreter of Maladies. 1999.
21.Skoulding, Zoe. Contemporary Women's Poetry and Urban Spaces: Experimental Cities. 2013
22.Cisneros, Sandra. Women Hollering Creek. 1992.