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Credit- Degree applicable
Effective Quarter: Fall 2015

I. Catalog Information

WMST 8
Women of Color in the USA
4 Unit(s)

 

(See general education pages for the requirement this course meets.)

Requisites: Advisory: EWRT 1A or EWRT 1AH or ESL 5.

Hours: Four hours lecture (48 hours total per quarter).

Also Listed As:

Description: An interdisciplinary, multi perspective and comparative study of the experiences of women of color in the United States. The constructs of race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality as they relate to social institutions and national ideologies will be explored. Examination and analysis of the historical, political, and economic influences that have informed the relationships between women of color and white women in the U.S.A, is foundational to this course.


Student Learning Outcome Statements (SLO)

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Recognize the ways in which we have privilege and oppression. Investigate how we alternately behave as oppressors and as the oppressed.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Explain the role of key historical events that shaped the present situation of Women of Color in the U.S.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Understand and analyze the social construction of race, class, gender, and sexuality and the impact of racism, sexism, classism, and hetero-sexism on Women of Color in the U.S.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Critique the multiple identities within ourselves and in the larger society.


II. Course Objectives

A.Recognize the historical, philosophical, theoretical background of women's studies as both interdisciplinary and having multiple perspectives.
B.Assess the impact of socialization, ethnicity, and culture on the lives of women of color as social, political, sexual, spiritual, professional and private individuals.
C.Critically analyze the intersection of ethnicity, race, class and gender in the lives of women of color and how these issues and resultant problems are treated in the contemporary literature, scholarships, and visual media.
D.Compare and contrast the ethnic, cultural, sexual, religious, political, and economic status held by women of color and white women in the U.S.A.
E.Analyze the factors which influence the structure of female gender within various cultural and ethnic groups.
F.Examine the influences of oppression and racism on the lives of women of color and their varied responses from a contemporary and historical perspective.
G.Critically examine the relationships between gender, sexuality, ethnicity, sexism, ageism and racism and their manifestation as problems: sexual abuse, violence against women, sexual harassment and poverty.
H.Examine the diverse life experiences of women of color in the U.S.A.
I.Explore the responses and activism of women of color to social, political, and economic marginalization and oppression in the U.S.A.
J.Synthesize the new body of knowledge concerning issues related to women of color and their concentric circles of influence in order to contextualize this information within contemporary social issues in the U.S.A.

III. Essential Student Materials

 None

IV. Essential College Facilities

 None

V. Expanded Description: Content and Form

A.Recognize the historical, philosophical, theoretical background of women's studies as both interdisciplinary and having multiple perspectives.
1.History of women's studies as interdisciplinary and inclusive of multiple perspectives.
2.Introduce and assess the methodological approaches to the study of women and the central fields from which it draws upon including: the Humanities orientation of history and philosophy and the Behavioral Sciences orientation of sociology, psychology, and anthropology.
a.Uses of participatory research methodology.
b.Application of qualitative cross cultural research.
c.Uses of Ethnographic research methodology.
d.Application of Feminist Historiographies.
3.Major theoretical frameworks used to analyze gender relations.
4.Womanist and Feminist critiques of the traditional disciplines, and evolution of those disciplines.
a.Perspectives of women of color on women studies as an area of inquiry.
b.Theories of power and oppression.
c.Theories of the intersection of different forms of oppression.
B.Assess the impact of socialization, ethnicity, and culture on the lives of women of color as social, political, sexual, spiritual, professional and private individuals.
1.Definitions "feminine", "feminist", "woman", "womanhood", and "womanism".
2.Differences in the lives of rural and urban women.
3.Women's sexuality as it is culturally positioned within class and economic status.
4.The role of spirituality among women of color
5.Women's political, professional, social and private lives.
C.Critically analyze the intersection of ethnicity, race, class and gender in the lives of women of color and how these issues and resultant problems are treated in the contemporary literature, scholarships, and visual media.
1.Definition of ethnicity, race, class and gender.
2.Perspectives on issues of ethnicity, race, class and gender from both3.
3.Womanist and feminist scholars.
4.Treatment of issues related to women of color in literature.
5.Problems resulting from the intersection of racism and sexism.
6.Women of color and white women in the media.
D.Compare and contrast the ethnic, cultural, sexual, religious, political, and economic status held by women of color and white women in the U.S.A.
1.Definition of status and the contextual backdrop of engendered power relationships in the U.S.A.
2.Concentric Circles of Influence and the placement of women of color, white women, men of color and white men.
3.Influences on the roles of women.
4.Contemporary social phenomena that influence and impact the roles of women.
E.Analyze the factors which influence the structure of female gender within various cultural and ethnic groups.
1.Gender systems in various societies
2.Redefinition of gender in queer studies.
3.Social construction of gender as it relates to ethnicity, culture, economics and class.
4.Gender bias in the family, media, legal system, and education. Theories: Double-bind, Multiple Oppression, Institutionalized Racism, Stereotype Threat, Adobe and Glass Ceilings.
5.Institutionalized racism and sexism.
6.Gender bias perpetuated by women.
F.Examine the influences of oppression and racism on the lives of women of color and their varied responses from a contemporary and historical perspective.
1.Structure of oppression and racism in the U. S.A.
2.Women of color and internalized oppression.
3.White women and privilege.
4.Historiographies of women of color oral and written.
5.Evolution of the Feminist movement and the response to exclusion by women of color.
6.Differing strategies for social/political activism among women of color and white women.
7.Self-definition and empowerment of women of color.
G.Critically examine the relationships between gender, sexuality, ethnicity, sexism, ageism and racism and their manifestation as problems: sexual abuse, violence against women, sexual harassment and poverty.
1.Racism, ageism, classism, ableism, homophobia, sexism and their intersection with gender.
2.The justice system in the U.S.A. in relationship to domestic violence, rape, sexual harassment and employment discrimination.
3.Relationships to women and children of color to the social systems in the U.S.A.
4.Beauty images related to the health and safety of women.
5.Institutional, community and personal responses to health problems of women of color.
H.Examine the diverse life experiences of women of color in the U.S.A.
1.Forced and voluntary migration of families of women of color.
2.Social histories of women of color.
3.Racism and its impact on the identity development of women of color.
4.Education as a vehicle for liberation
5.Story telling as a vehicle for the transmission of cultural values within the lives women of color.
6."Beauty is in the eye of the beholder": Racism resultant in myths and stereotypes surrounding the beauty and sexuality of women of color.
7.Internalized oppression as a construct
8.White women and women of color victims of a "mythical norm".
I.Explore the responses and activism of women of color to social, political, and economic marginalization and oppression in the U.S.A.
1.Women of color and their roles in the women's liberation movement.
2.Women of color and their roles in the civil rights movement.
3.Major problems and challenges for women of color within socio-political movements.
4.Women of color in contemporary socio-political movements and their connection to global issues.
5.Building Alliances and coalitions with white women and women of color.
a.Conceptual differences in the notion of "sisterhood".
b.The arts as a political vehicle for change for women of color.
J.Synthesize the new body of knowledge concerning issues related to women of color and their concentric circles of influence in order to contextualize this information within contemporary social issues in the U.S.A.
1.Recognition of student's sense of self as a gendered person.
2.Realization of the similarities and differences in the life experiences of women of color and white women.
3.Incorporation of the concepts of womanism and feminism as differentiating the lived experiences of women of color and white women in the U.S.A.
4.Reflection on the relationships between ethnicity, culture, gender, class and racism in the U.S.A.
5.Application of theoretical constructs in the analysis of social, political, and economic issues and problems as they are related to women and specifically women of color who reside in the U.S.A.
6.Reflection on student's relationship to the experiences of women in general and women of color specifically.
7.Recognition of the factors which contribute to the development of alliances and coalitions between women from diverse backgrounds.

VI. Assignments

A.Written:
1.Develop a written and oral presentation which reflects their incorporation of theoretical constructs introduced in the course and must demonstrate how these constructs inform their individual lives and experiences through "Telling Your Story". Typical in-class assignments include individual written work prepared for discussion of texts and analysis, and group analysis of specified topics presented orally.
2.Prepare a "creative", written, group project which will be shared with the class.
3.Weekly journals as a method of demonstrating their ability to critically analyze and synthesize the knowledge and information attained from the daily reading assignments.
4.Quizzes, midterm and Final examination will require comparative written analysis of the topics covered by the reading, class lectures, discussions, and presentations.
B.Reading: Required reading selections from the primary texts and other assigned readings daily.
C.Service Learning and Civic Engagement: Students will participate in a minimum of 12 hours of integrated service learning, and reflect on it in writing.
D.Participate in small and large group discussions. Lead such discussions with the help of their own group.

VII. Methods of Instruction

 Lecture and visual aids
Discussion of assigned reading
Discussion and problem solving performed in class
In-class exploration of Internet sites
Quiz and examination review performed in class
Homework and extended projects
Collaborative learning and small group exercises
Collaborative projects

VIII. Methods of Evaluating Objectives

A.Students will explain their understanding of the ways in which privilege and oppression work in the lives of women of color though responses in quizzes, midterm, bi-weekly written journals and a comprehensive final examination.
B.Students will be evaluated of the clarity and the analytical quality of both their written and oral work. They should be able to explain the role of key historical events that shaped the present situations of Women of Color in the US.
C.Students will exhibit their ability to plan, organize and present a group and an individual research project on topics that express their understanding of social constructions of race, class, gender, and sexuality and the impact of racism, sexism, classism, and hetero-sexism on Women of Color in the US.
D.Students will successfully participate in small group and large group discussions. Their contributions will be reflected on in writing and through discussion with their groups.
E.Students will make an effective contribution to the community, and write a brief reflection on civic engagement projects.

IX. Texts and Supporting References

A.Examples of Primary Texts and References
1.Anderson, Margaret L. and Patricia hill Collins, eds. Race, Class, and Gender. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company, 8th Ed., 2012.
2.Blackwell, Maylei. "¡Chicana Power! Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement". Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 2011.
3.Hill Collins, P. 2005. Black Sexual Politics: African-Americans, Gender and the New Racism. Routledge, New York.
4.Ore, Tracy E. The Social Construction of Difference and Inequality: Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality.New York, McGraw Hill, 2011.
5.Rojas, Maythee. "Women of Color and Feminism". New York, NY: Seal Press, 2009.
B.Examples of Supporting Texts and References
1.Anzaldua, Gloria E. and Analouise Keating, "This Bridge We Call Home: Radical Visions for Transformation". New York, NY: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group, 2002.
2.Anzaldua, Gloria and Cherrie Moraga,eds. "This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color". Watertown, Ma: Peresphone Press, 3 rd. Ed., 2002
3.Lorde, Audre, "Sister Outsider: Essays & Speeches by Audre Lorde". Freedom, CA: The Crossing Press, 1984.
4.Allen, Paula Gunn. "The Sacred Hoop: Recovering the Feminine in American Indian Tradition", Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 1986.
5.Ahmed, L. "Women and Gender in Islam: Historical Roots of a Modern Debate". New Haven, 1992.
6.Amott, Theresa and Julie Mattaei. "Race, Gender and Work: A Multicultural Economic History of Women in the United States". Boston, MA: South End Press, 1989.
7.Asian Women United of California, Making Waves: An Anthology of Writings By and 8. Aisenberg, Nadya and Mona Harrington, "Women of Academe: Outsiders in the Sacred Grove". Amherst, MA: The University of Massachusetts Press, 1988.
8.Batallie, Gretchen and Kathleen Mullen Sands. "American Indian Women: Telling Their Lives". NE: University of Nebraska Press, 1984.
9.Brannon, Linda. "Gender: Psychological Perspectives". Boston, MA: Pearson Education, Inc., 2004.
10.Caraway, Nancy. "Segregated Sisterhood: Racism and Politics of American Feminism". Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 1992.
11.Collins, Patricia Hill. "Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and The Politics of Empowerment". New York, NY: Routlege, Chapman and Hall, Inc., 1990.
12.Collier, Jane Fishburne and Sylvia Junko Yanagisako, eds. "Gender and Kinship: Essays Toward a Unified Analysis". Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1987.
13.Davis, Angela. "Women, Culture, Politics". New York: Vintage Books, 1990.
14.Davis, Angela. "Women, Race and Class". New York, NY: Vintage Books, 1983.
15.Disch, Estelle. "Reconstructing Gender: A Multicultural Anthology". New York, NY: McGraw Hill, 2003.
16.Essed, P. "Everyday Racism:Reports from women of Two Cultures". Claremont, CA: Hunter House Inc., 1990
17.Hochschild, A. R. and A. Machung. "The Second Shift". New York, Avon Books, 1997.
18.Hooks, Bell. "Feminist Theory From Margin to Center". Boston, MA: South End Press, 1984.
19.Hooks, Bell. "Reel to Real: Race , Sex, and Class at The Movies". New York, NY: Routlege, 1996.
20.Hurtado, A. "The Color of Privilege: Three Blasphemies on Race and Feminism". Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 1996.
21.Lee, Mary Paik. "Quiet Odyssey: A Pioneer Korean Woman in America". Edited with an Introduction by Sucheng Chang. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press, 1990.
22.Ortner, S. B. "Making Gender: The Politics and Erotics of Culture". Boston: Beacon Press, 1996.
23.Ruiz, V. and E.C. DuBois. "Unequal Sisters: a Multicultural Reader in U. S. Women's 25". New York, NY: Routledge Publishing, 2000.
24.Trinh, Minh-Ha. "Woman, Native, Other". Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1989.
25.Zia, Helen. "Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of An American People". New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2000.