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Credit- Degree applicable
Effective Quarter: Fall 2016

I. Catalog Information

ICS 26
Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Studies
4 Unit(s)

 

Formerly: (Formerly ICS 96.)

(See general education pages for the requirement this course meets.)

Requisites: Advisory: EWRT 1A or EWRT 1AH or ESL 5.

Hours: Lec Hrs: 48.00
Out of Class Hrs: 96.00
Total Student Learning Hrs: 144.00

Also Listed As:

Description: An interdisciplinary, multi-perspective, critical analysis and comparative study of the broad range of contemporary lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer issues in various contexts including biomedical, sociological, political, cultural, economic, racial and sexual. This course will explore the relationship between LGBTQ individuals and the social and political constructs of gender, sexuality, citizenship, and identity as they relate to social and political institutions and national ideologies. The values, experience, and cultural contributions of LGBTQ individuals in the United States will be identified, examined, and authenticated.


Student Learning Outcome Statements (SLO)

 

• Student Learning Outcome: Demonstrate awareness of assumptions, beliefs, values, and behaviors with regard to sexuality and gender identity.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Understand the multiple identities within one's self and recognized the socializing forces of culture, privilege, and oppression in shaping our frames of reference in regards to sexuality and gender identity.


 

• Student Learning Outcome: Interact and discuss issues of sexuality and gender identity in a safe classroom learning environment.


II. Course Objectives

A.Distinguish between biological traits and the social and cultural construction of gender identity.
B.Explore the interrelationship of the social and political systems of gender, sexuality, and identity oppression in the United States.
C.Review the history of "traditional" gender roles in the United States and recognize the impact of such roles on social and political institutions and individual lives.
D.Analyze the historic, social, and cultural roles that gender, sexuality, and identity play in institutions within the United States.
E.Examine the historical roots of LGBTQ identity in the United States.
F.Analyze the historical, social, cultural, and political roots of gender discrimination, homophobia, trans-phobia, misogyny and hate crimes in the United States.
G.Understand one's own identity within the gender and sexuality continuum. Develop an awareness of one's own history within a system of gender and sexuality hierarchies and understand the impact of these hierarchies on the formation of one's identity.
H.Apply the concepts learned to the development of strategies for challenging hierarchies and legal discrimination in the United States that are based on oppressive theories of "gender" and sexual orientation.

III. Essential Student Materials

 None

IV. Essential College Facilities

 None

V. Expanded Description: Content and Form

A.Distinguish between biological traits and the social and cultural construction of gender identity.
1.Compare and contrast the biological, and sociological and cultural constructions of sex and gender. Discuss the difference between biological characteristics of sexual difference and social and cultural performances of gendered roles. By the end of the course, students will be able to determine the difference between biological sex and socially and culturally constructed gender. They will also display their appreciations of cultural differences in the LGBTQ community in the United States through classroom discussion, in presentations, on exams, and in research and/or term papers.
2.Analyze the sociological and historical creation of gender in the United States and understand that gendered behavior is a cultural and historical performance that can be modified by the choices of individuals.
B.Explore the interrelationship of the social and political systems of gender, sexuality, and identity oppression in the United States.
1.Understand and analyze the sociological theory of Intersectionality through learning and analyzing the Matrix of Domination.
2.Investigate how historical and legal recognitions of gender and socially created sexuality classifications construct differences and values in concepts such as "woman," "man," "womanhood" and "manhood," "heterosexual," "homosexual," "bisexual," "transgender," and "queer" in the United States.
3.Analyze the sexual and gender dynamics of stereotypes.
4.Examine how biological, and socially and culturally constructed, differences affect experiences and are used to shape an understanding of the meanings of "gender" and "sexuality" to facilitate one's identity in the United States.
C.Review the history of "traditional" gender roles in the United States and recognize the impact of such roles on social and political institutions and individual lives.
1.Investigate the meaning of gender. Explore the concepts of "man" and "woman"and how such concepts were formed.
2.Compare and contrast gender roles and the social and political meaning of sexuality throughout history with those of today.
3.Analyze the oppression and legal discrimination of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer individuals, in the United States, throughout history.
4.Measure the economic and political gains and loses of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer individuals and the LGBTQ community.
D.Analyze the historic, social, and cultural roles that gender, sexuality, and identity play in institutions within the United States.
1.Identify social and political institutions such as government, education, professional associations, community organizations, churches, etc.
2.Explore the ways gender and sexuality hierarchies shape institutions.
3.Evaluate the role that an individual plays within an institution, shaped by their personal history and identity.
E.Examine the historical roots of LGBTQ identity in the United States.
1.Understand sexuality as a social construct.
2.Learn the conceptual history of the terms "heterosexual" and "homosexual."
3.Analyze the conceptualization of "normal" sexual behavior.
4.Recognize gender and sexuality classifications and their historical transformations.
F.Analyze the historical, social, cultural, and political roots of gender discrimination, homophobia, trans-phobia, misogyny and hate crimes in the United States.
1.Understand the concept of citizenship.
2.Probe the pseudo-scientific justification for gender discrimination, homophobia, and transphobia.
3.Recognize the religious justification for gender discrimination, homophobia, and transphobia.
4.Examine laws established concerning gender discrimination and hate crimes.
G.Understand one's own identity within the gender and sexuality continuum. Develop an awareness of one's own history within a system of gender and sexuality hierarchies and understand the impact of these hierarchies on the formation of one's identity.
1.Explore one's gender and sexual identity.
2.Analyze the historical place of various groups based on gender and sexuality hierarchies.
3.Understand how gender and sexuality shape one's perception of themselves and others.
4.Explore the possibility of a society without gender and sexuality classifications.
H.Apply the concepts learned to the development of strategies for challenging hierarchies and legal discrimination in the United States that are based on oppressive theories of "gender" and sexual orientation.
1.Analyze the barriers within institutions, which impact the individual student the most.
2.Develop strategies for one's maturation in terms of acknowledgment, awareness, inquiry and skill building on the learned topics.
3.Advance strategies for social and political institutional change.

VI. Assignments

A.Reading
1.Reading assignments from the textbook
2.Supplemental readings are assigned to provide more in-depth knowledge on specific topics and issues
B.Writing
1.Four two-page analytical essays.
2.One five-page research paper displaying the ability of the student to gather information, analyze perspectives, and create a coherent argument based on factual evidence from researched sources.
C.Group Project
1.Students will participate in a group project in conjunction with a specific topic pertaining to the course
2.Each group will present their assignment to the class.
3.Each individual will write a three to four page paper analyzing the topic of their group project.
D.Class Discussions
1.Students will actively participate in weekly class discussions on various topics throughout the course.
2.Students will take take take notes on all guest speakers and media shown in class.
3.Students will lead a class discussion based on one of the main themes of the course.

VII. Methods of Instruction

 Lecture and visual aids
Discussion of assigned reading
Quiz and examination review performed in class
Guest speakers
In-class exploration of Internet sites
Collaborative learning and small group exercises
Collaborative projects
Homework and extended projects

VIII. Methods of Evaluating Objectives

A.Writing assignments such as analytical essays and a research paper to evaluate student's ability to synthesize course material and to discuss critically issues related to LGBTQ individuals and the LGBTQ community.
B.Midterm and final exam with essay questions discussion content from lectures and readings to evaluate student's ability to provide a historical and aesthetic understanding of LGBTQ issues.
C.Small group projects and class discussions to evaluate the student's ability to analyze and apply an understanding of differing perspectives within the interpersonal dynamics of a classroom.

IX. Texts and Supporting References

A.Examples of Primary Texts and References
1.Yoshino, Kenji. "Covering: The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights." New York: random House, 2006.
2.Meem, Deborah. "Finding Out: An Introduction into LGBT Studies, 2nd Edition." California: Sage Publications, Inc., 2013.
3.Mock, Janet, "Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More." New York: Atria Books, 2013.
4.Sullivan, Nikki. "A Critical Introduction into Queer Theory." New York: New York University Press, 2003.
5.Lovaas, Karen, John P. Elia and Gust A. Yep, eds. "LGBT Studies and Queer Theory." New York: Harrington Park Press, 2007.
B.Examples of Supporting Texts and References
1.Butler, Judith. "Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity." New York: Routledge, 1999.
2.Halberstram, Judith. "Female Masculinity." North Carolina: Duke University Press, 1998.
3.D'Emilio, John. "Intimate Matters: A History of Sexuality in America." Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1988.
4.Bagemihl, Bruce. "Biological Exuberance: Animal Homosexuality and Natural Diversity." New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999.
5.Faderman, Lillian. "Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in 20th Century America." New York: Columbia University Press, 1992.
6.Teunis, Niels and Gilbert Herd, ed. "Sexual Inequalities and Social Justice." California: University of California Press, 2007.
7.Green, Jamison. "Becoming a Visible Man." Tennessee: Vanderbilt University Press, 2004.
8.Baldwin, James. "Giovanni's Room." New York: Delta Trade Paperbacks, 1956.
9.Hall, Radclyffe. "The Well of Loneliness." United Kingdom: Wordsworth Publications, 1928.
10.Fausto-Sterling, Ann. "Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality." New York: Basic Books, 2000.
11.Abelove, Henry, Michele Aina Barale, and David M. Halperin, eds. "The Lesbian & Gay Studies Reader." New York: Routledge, 1993.
12.Duberman, Martin. "Hidden From History: Reclaiming Gay and Lesbian Past." New York: NAL Books, 1989.
13.Adams, Barry. "The Rise of A Gay & Lesbian Movement." New York: Twayne Publishers, 1995.
14.Adams, Maurianne, Warren Blumenfeld, Carmelita Castaneda, Heather W. Hackman, Madeline L. Peters, and Ximena Zuniga eds. "Readings for Diveristy and Social Justice, 2nd Ed." New York: Routledge, 2010.
15.Kimmel, Michael and Abby Ferber, eds. "Privilege: A Reader, 2nd. Ed." Pennsylvania: Westview Press, 2010.
16."And the Band Played On." Dir. Roger Spottiswoode. Home Box Office, 1993.
17."Paris is Burning." Dir. Jennie Livingston. Miramax, 1990.
18."Tongues Untied." Dir. Marlon Riggs. 1989.
19."U People." Dirs. Olive Demetrius and Hanifah Walidah. U People LLC, 2009.
20."Speaking for Ourselves: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Youth." Diversity Productions, 1994.
21."Before Stonewall." Dirs. Great Schiller and Robert Rosenberg. Frameline, 1984.
22."After Stonewall." Dir. John Scagliotto. First Run Features, 1999.
23."The Celluloid Closet." Dirs. Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman. Tri Star Pictures, 1996.
24."The Times of Harvey Milk." Dir. Rob Epstein. New Yorker Films, 1984.
25."For the Bible Tells Me So." Dir. Daniel G. Karslake. First Run Features, 2007.